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    Regulatory for the Circular Economy

    Regulatory for the Circular Economy
    Type
    Author
    Technopolis Group
    Fraunhofer ISI
    Wuppertal Institute
    thinkstep
    Publication Date
    11/2016
    Country
    Germany
    Language for original content
    Scope

    This report, commissioned by DG GROW and prepard by Technopolis and Franhofer ISI, identified major obstacles of regulatory nature or gaps within the existing legal framework where significant unlocked opportunities remain. The study includes an in-depth analysis of the identified obstacles and possible solutions through specific cases.

    The analysis of specific regulatory barriers includes the full product lifecycle and focuses on the interfaces between different steps of the value chain (extraction/production, production/production internal loops, production/use, collection, waste-management/recycling/production).

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    Models of circular business ecosystem for textiles

    Model of circular business ecosystem for textiles
    Type
    Author
    Paula Fontell
    Pirjo Heikkila
    Publication Date
    11/2017
    Country
    Finland
    Language for original content
    Scope
    Paula Fontell

    The Relooping Fashion Initiative (2015-2017) was aimed at piloting and modelling the circular business ecosystem for textiles. This report covers the business ecosystem modelling work and introduces the project team’s crystallized vision of a higher-level system that enables the textiles industry to operate according to the basic principles of a circular economy. 

    The focus of the report is on explaining the principles of a circular economy in the context of textiles, and drawing a picture of the key material flows and types of actors along the value cycles from end-user back to end-user. The overall goal is to maintain the value of materials as high as possible, with minimum environmental impact. The different circular business models for textiles are introduced along the value cycles.

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    The circular economy and the bioeconomy — Partners in sustainability

    EEA
    Type
    Author
    European Environmental Agency
    Publication Date
    08/2018
    Country
    Denmark
    Language for original content
    Scope

    'The circular economy and the bioeconomy — Partners in sustainability' is the third EEA report on the circular economy. It aims to support the framing, implementation and evaluation of European circular economy policy from an environmental perspective. It shows that the two policy agendas have similar objectives and areas of intervention, including food waste, biomass and bio-based products, and that they would benefit from stronger links, particularly in product and infrastructure design, and collaboration throughout the value chain.

    The increasing demand for food, feed, biomaterials and bioenergy resources could worsen the over-exploitation of natural resources. By extending the lifetime of products and recycling materials, a circular bio-economy approach can help retain material value.

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    CE opportunities in the furniture sector

    EEB
    Type
    Author
    EEB
    Eunomia
    Publication Date
    09/2017
    Country
    Belgium
    Language for original content
    Stephane Arditi

    This EEB and Eunomia report estimates the material consumption and CO2 emissions of the furniture sector at EU level and suggests some circular scenarios and policy options to grasp improvement opportunities.

    Barriers to a circular furniture sector range from low quality materials, limited logistical infrastructure, poor demand for recycled materials to a wider range identified through the course of this research, informed through stakeholder consultation and literature review.

    A move towards circular economy models within the European furniture sector would benefit from a variety of complimentary policy instruments to deal with market failures on the supply side and the demand side (creating demand for these products).

     

     

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    Implementing Circular Economy globally makes Paris targets achievable

    Implementing Circular Economy globally makes Paris targets achievable
    Type
    Author
    ECOFYS
    Circle Economy
    Publication Date
    06/2016
    Country
    Netherlands
    Language for original content
    Cornelis Blok
    Contact Person Name (for publication on the website)
    Preeti Srivastav

    The climate conference in Paris has produced a landmark agreement. The emission reduction commitments made by 195 countries are a leap forward, but not yet sufficient to stay on a 2 °C trajectory, let alone a 1.5 °C pathway. Current commitments address only half the gap between business as usual and the 1.5 °C pathway. There is still a reduction of about 15 billion tonnes CO2e needed to reach the 1.5 °C target. Further solutions are therefore needed; solutions that go beyond decarbonising our energy system. This white paper by Ecofys and Circle Economy looks into the contribution a global circular economy could presumably make to bridging the emissions gap.

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    Circular Economy and Employment

    CE employment
    Author
    Prof. Dr. Jens Horbach
    Klaus Rennings
    Katrin Sommerfeld
    Publication Date
    09/2015
    Country
    Germany
    Language for original content
    Scope
    Jens Horbach

    Circular Economy and Employment first summarizes the main definitions and conceptualisations of a circular economy, then clarifies the relationship to related concepts such as green growth and eco-innovation. This report is the outcome of a project estimating the employment effects of a circular economy.

    The Circular Economy mainly focuses on savings on the shares of material, labour, energy, and capital embedded in the product. In finite systems it is intended to “design out waste”. An important difference is made between consumables (one or few time usage) and durables (years of usage) products. Material savings can be achieved by already established recycling and remanufacturing activities finally aiming at a “zero waste economy”.

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    Employment and the circular economy: Job creation in a more resource efficient Britain

    Employment in Britain
    Type
    Author
    WRAP
    Green Alliance
    Publication Date
    12/2015
    Country
    United Kingdom
    Language for original content

    Britain faces huge economic challenges in its use of labour and scarce natural resources. Although unemployment is now falling, the risk of being out of work is higher in some regions and for some types of occupations. While Britain has significantly increased its resource efficiency in recent years, supply risks in an increasingly competitive global economy mean that we need to get better at using natural resources. A new research study, undertaken jointly by WRAP and the Green Alliance, shows that these challenges are linked: improving our resource efficiency can make a valuable contribution to improving Britain’s labour market situation. One route to improving resource efficiency is to develop a circular economy.

  • Type
    Author
    Circle Economy
    EHero
    Publication Date
    03/2017
    Country
    Netherlands
    Language for original content
    Harald Friedl

    Aimed at defining, identifying and quantifying employment opportunities that are needed in the circular economy, Circle Economy and the Erasmus Research Institute for Happiness Economics (Ehero) have developed a standardised and replicable methodology that measures circular employment in cities around the world.

    Once identified, the circular jobs were categorised according to the seven key elements of the circular economy, showing that a large majority are focused on ‘incorporating digital technology’ and ‘preserving and extending what’s already made’. In the past fifteen years, activities that involve ‘repair & maintenance‘ have remained stable in numbers, with the ‘incorporation of digital technologies’ becoming an up and coming job provider.

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    WP - Breaking the Barriers to a Circular Economy

    Breaking the Barriers to the Circular Economy
    Type
    Author
    Deloitte
    Utrecht University
    Publication Date
    10/2017
    Country
    Netherlands
    Language for original content
    Scope
    Julian Kirchherr

    The Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Utrecht University, the Netherlands and Deloitte have jointly carried out research on barriers to the Circular Economy (CE) in the European Union. For this research, a survey with 153 businesses, 55 government officials and expert interviews with forty-seven thought leaders on the circular economy from businesses, governments, academia and NGOs have been carried out. Two types of barriers emerged as main barriers.

    There are the cultural barriers of lacking consumer interest and awareness as well as a hesitant company culture. This finding is at odds with claims that the circular economy concept is hyped; rather, the concept may be a niche discussion among sustainable development professionals.

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    Developing a national programme for textiles and clothing recovery

    Author
    Mohammad Bukharu
    Ruth Carrasco-Gallego
    Eva Ponce-Cueto
    Publication Date
    03/2018
    Country
    France
    Language for original content

    Textiles waste is relatively small in terms of weight as compared to other waste streams, but it has a large impact on human health and environment, and its rate is increasing due to the ‘fast fashion’ model. In this paper, the authors examine the French national programme for managing post-consumer textiles and clothing through a case study research.

    France is the only country in the world implementing an extended producer responsibility (EPR) policy for end-of-use clothing, linen and shoes. The case highlights the benefits of using an EPR policy and provides interesting insights about the challenges faced by the textiles waste sector. For instance, the EPR policy has contributed to a threefold increase in the collection and recycling rates of post-consumer textiles since 2006.

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