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This section includes relevant practices, innovative processes and 'learning from experience' examples. All information is provided by the stakeholders themselves who remain responsible for accuracy and veracity of the content.

To submit your own Good Practice, please complete this form.

Please note that the publication of Good Practices on this website depends on their relevance to the circular economy, completeness and clarity of information, practical character of expected results, awareness-raising and educational components. Texts and content submitted to the site may be edited for the purpose of clarity and compliance to standardised presentation on the website.  For further information, please contact our Secretariat.

Wondering how we select good practices for actual publication on the website? You can check our guidelines here.

 

Displaying 1 - 10 of 288

MUD jeans: circular denims (almost) never die

Circular jeans from MUD Jeans with printed waistband label.

Type of organisation or company:

Country: 
Netherlands

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Key Area:

Customers from the MUD brand can lease or buy their jeans, benefit from a free repair service, and return the worn out items to have them recycled into new denim products - so that the iconic piece of clothing remains in use for the longuest time. This brand philosophy saves 78% water and 61% CO2-eq per jeans compared to industry standards.

ZERO BRINE recovers valuable resources from saline wastewater in the Polish mining industry

Type of organisation or company:

Country: 
Poland

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ZERO BRINE is running a pilot project to recover valuable resources from wastewater in the Polish mining industry so that they can be reused in other sectors.

La Tête dans les Nuages creates multicoloured bean bags out of exhausted hot air balloons

La Tête dans les Nuages gives a second chance to hot air balloons, advertising posters and polystyrene packaging, which would otherwise go to waste, by upcycling them into bean bags.

Reverse Resources promotes upcycling of textile leftovers and creates supply chain transparency with online platform

Type of organisation or company:

Country: 
Estonia, Other (Bangladesh)

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Scope:

Reverse Resources is an Estonian company that offers an online “circular” solution that tracks and traces waste flows by connecting manufacturers, waste handlers, recyclers/spinners and brands on one platform by offering 360 degree transparency, data accuracy and real-time transactions on waste flows.

SWEETS hotel upcycles Amsterdam's bridge houses into unique guest rooms

sweets hotel room example

Type of organisation or company:

Country: 
Netherlands

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Scope:

Since 2012, SWEETS hotel has been adapting Amsterdam's abandoned bridge houses into unique flats, thus preventing their demolition.

"+Ricicli +Viaggi" makes it possible to pay for metro rides with plastic bottles

Type of organisation or company:

Country: 
Italy

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The Roman public transport provider, Atac, has launched +Ricicli +Viaggi (the more you recycle, the more you travel), a pilot scheme in which riders can pay for travel with PET plastic bottles.

Starlinger develops a closed loop model for polypropylene 'big bags'

starlinger recycled big bag

Type of organisation or company:

Country: 
Austria

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Scope:

To create a circular economy for Flexible Intermediate Bulk Containers, Starlinger, a plastic packaging machinery and process technology engineering company from Austria, has simulated a closed loop for polypropylene - the main component of big bags - in cooperation with renowned big bag manufacturers Louis Blockx and LC Packaging.

Thanks to smart design, Stella Soomlais' leather bags can be re-cut and re-made as smaller items

Type of organisation or company:

Country: 
Estonia

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Estonian leather goods maker Stella Soomlais has come up with an innovative bag design that enables old or damaged leather bags to be turned into new leather goods, with little leftover material.

Gelatex: this leather-like fabric is actually made of low value waste from the livestock industry

Type of organisation or company:

Country: 
Estonia

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Estonian company Gelatex Technologies has designed a new textile made of gelatine - a substance derived from livestock industry waste. Compared to other materials, this innovative textile is the closest thing to leather. The product is easily scalable, quick to produce and environmentally-friendly.

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