You are here

Repair, reuse, refurbish

22 Nov 2018 to 23 Nov 2018
Role of Social Enterprise in a Circular Economy

Event type:

City: 
Nijmegen
Country: 
Netherlands

RREUSE, the European network of social enterprises in re-use, repair and recycling will hold its second annual conference in the city of Nijmegen, Europe’s Green Capital for 2018. High profile speakers and thinkers ranging from European institutions, public authorities, private industry and social enterprises will present their views in order to stimulate this timely debate on how to reach out to citizens in order to support the circular economy and explore the role that social enterprises have in this transition.

Upcycling the Oceans collects marine trash and turns it into quality yarn

fisherman holding upcycling the oceans trash container

Type of organisation or company:

Country: 
Spain, Other (Thailand)

Language for original content:

The ECOALF foundation has embarked upon its most ambitious project to date: Upcycling the Oceans, an unprecedented worldwide adventure that is helping to remove up to 200 tonnes of waste from the bottom of the oceans thanks to the support of over 3000 fishermen.

Unique wristbands that reduce 'ghostfishing'

Bracenet adriatic sea bracelet from discarded fishing nets

Type of organisation or company:

Country: 
Germany

Language for original content:

Bracenet collects discarded fishing nets, sends these to Norway to have them turned into fabric and then produces unique wristbands in workshops that provide employment opportunities to disabled persons.

Shoemaker Andrea Verdura turns fishing nets into fashion statements

Verdura's Woman Boot made with recycled fishing net

Type of organisation or company:

Country: 
Italy

Language for original content:

Andrea Verdura uses different eco-friendly materials to craft stylish, comfortable footwear for women, men and kids. One of the materials used in the footwear are recycled fishing nets.

30 Oct 2018 to 01 Nov 2018
CE hotspot Scotland logo

Event type:

City: 
Glasgow
Country: 
United Kingdom

Scotland has been selected as this year's host nation for Circular Economy Hotspot. Zero Waste Scotland plans to host #CEHotspotScot as a major international event and trade mission to showcase Scotland's progressive approach to developing a circular economy and the best of our burgeoning circular businesses to a global audience.

The unmissable programme will include visits to pioneering Scottish businesses, sessions led by the country's foremost names in circular economy policy and innovation, and extensive networking opportunities.

17 Oct 2018 to 18 Oct 2018
ressourceneffizienzkongres

With more than 1.000 participants over two days, the Congress for resource efficiency and the circular economy is one of the leading conferences on the topic in Germany. In 19 hours 90 different speakers provide input in keynotes and around 15 workshops. Additionally, there is an exhibition part with stands of involved stakeholders.

Renting of baby clothes: Räubersachen

raubersachen logo

Raubersachen (robbers' loot in German) applies the concept of product-as-a-service to baby clothes, providing parents with a ecological woollen alternatives by refurbishing disposed baby and toddler clothes and renting these out, thus reducing the amount of cheap, low-quality products being bought and keeping baby clothes in circulation far longer.

26 Sep 2018
EU circ business conf 2018

The Circular Businesses Conference aims to promote a broad mobilization of stakeholders from the primary, industry and services sectors, together with the public actors and the citizens around the challenges and the opportunities created by the development of a circular economy.

Kalundborg Symbiosis: six decades of a circular approach to production

logo of Kalundborg industrial symbiosis

Kalundborg Symbiosis is a partnership between nine public and private companies in Kalundborg, Denmark.

Cleanteach-Cluster Upper Austria

Logo Cleantech-Cluster

The Upper Autrian Cleantech-Cluster networks all actors from the resource supplier, to the manufacturer, industrial researcher, to mechanical engineers, recyclers, and disposers in order to find joint solutions and develop new technologies. We cooperate with our 10 cluster initiatives in the Upper Austrian business support agency and 2000 partner companies, whose activities range from plastics, to automotive, furniture and wood construction, food, medical technology, mechatronics, IT, logistics, and HR, In order to support projects for SMEs in particular, the cluster also supports EU funding applications, thus offering its partners an internationally mature circular economy toolbox.

THEMES and EXPERTISE in the network:

  • Material efficiency in production
  • Recycling
  • Recovery
  • Disposal
  • Circular design
  • Business Models
  • Initial and continuing education
  • Research

SERVICES:

  • Cross-sector networking with researchers, companies, associations (regional, national, international)
  • Project development
  • Project Management
  • Process support through conception, moderation of workshops, work meetings, events
  • Funding advice

Developing a national programme for textiles and clothing recovery

Developing a national programme for textiles and clothing recovery

Author: 
Mohammad Bukharu, Ruth Carrasco-Gallego, Eva Ponce-Cueto
Publication Date: 
03/2018
Country: 
France

Language for original content:

Textiles waste is relatively small in terms of weight as compared to other waste streams, but it has a large impact on human health and environment, and its rate is increasing due to the ‘fast fashion’ model. In this paper, the authors examine the French national programme for managing post-consumer textiles and clothing through a case study research.

France is the only country in the world implementing an extended producer responsibility (EPR) policy for end-of-use clothing, linen and shoes. The case highlights the benefits of using an EPR policy and provides interesting insights about the challenges faced by the textiles waste sector. For instance, the EPR policy has contributed to a threefold increase in the collection and recycling rates of post-consumer textiles since 2006. In addition, the material recovery rate of the post-consumer textiles can reach 90%, 50% of which can be directly reused. However, the ‘reuse’ stream is facing some challenges because its main market is in Africa and many African countries are considering banning the import of used textiles to encourage a competitive textiles industry locally and internationally.

The EPR policy shows a great potential to identify new markets for ‘reuse’ and to improve the textiles waste sector. Such an EPR policy also could drive societies to financially support innovation and research to provide feasible solutions for fashion producers to adopt eco-design and design for recycling practices. This paper provides guidance for policy makers, shareholders, researchers and practitioners interested in diverting post-consumer textiles and clothing waste from landfills and promoting circular textiles transition.

Die Oekonomischen auswirkungen einer Verbesserung des Deutschen Gewaehrleistungsrechts

Study on the economic impact of extending warranty rights in Europe

Type:

Author: 
Kilian Bizer, Martin Fuehr, Till Proeger
Publication Date: 
09/2016
Country: 
Germany

Language for original content:

Scope:

Contact: 
Otmar Lell

The study analysed the economic effects of the transposition of Directive 1999/44/EC concerning warranty rights, which had to be transposed into national law by January 2002. A number of publications had suggested that strengthening warranty rights for consumer goods as foreseen in the directive could increase the price level of these goods, possibly resulting in a reduced purchases. The study addressed both questions by analysing data from several EU countries. The first question was addressed by analysing inflation rates of general prices and of prices for the consumer goods affected by the directive in the time period 1998 until 2002. The second question was analysed by looking at the share of consumers who used online consumer-to-consumer markets, which were not covered by the warranty rights foreseen in the directive.

The comparison of inflation rates for consumer goods showed that inflation rates for consumer goods were below the general inflation rate between 1998 and 2004. Therefore, between 1998 and 2004 prices for the different groups of consumer goods covered by the directive did not increase but actually appear to have decreased slightly. This effect has been found for all countries analysed with no significant differences between countries transposing the minimum standards and those that went beyond. The second part of the analysis addressed the question if a developed market for online consumer-to-consumer selling of goods exists, for which the new seller's warranties weren't valid. In case of price increases for business-to-consumer markets – which have not been found in the first part of the analysis – part of the transactions could be transferred to these markets. The analysis showed that the vast majority of consumers in Western European countries used the internet regularly to purchase goods, including the online-platform Ebay. In case of increasing prices for consumer goods because of strengthened warranty rights, part of the transactions would move to online consumer-to-consumer markets rather than resulting in an overall decline of consumer goods purchases. The general conclusion was that over the analysed time period no negative impact of strengthened warranty rights on the price level of consumer goods could be found.

Sfridoo enables manufacturers to purchase and sell industrial scraps

Sfridoo

Type of organisation or company:

Country: 
Italy

Language for original content:

Sfridoo.com is an Italian B2B publishing platform for purchasing and selling scrap materials. Using sharing economy princples to turn the circular economy into a reality, Sfridoo has already enabled more than 100 businesses to recycle and reuse industrial scraps.

26 Nov 2018 to 29 Nov 2018
CARE-electronics

The International CARE Electronics Office is pleased to announce the Going Green – CARE INNOVATION 2018 conference and exhibition on Electronics and the Environment. It will take place in Vienna's Schoenbrunn Palace Conference Centre, which is situated in the Apothecaries’ Wing of the famous building. This 7th International Symposium and Environmental Exhibition, titled 'Towards a Resource Efficient Economy', is the platform to present the state of play of sustainable development and the development of eco-efficient electr(on)ic & automotive products.

Waste prevention in Europe - policies, status and trends in reuse in 2017

Waste prevention in Europe - policies, status and trends in reuse in 2017

Cover EEA report 4 2018

Type:

Author: 
Henning Wilts, Bettina Bahn-Walkowiak, Ybele Hoogeveen
Publication Date: 
06/2018
Country: 
Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, EU, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom

Language for original content:

Scope:

Contact: 
Ybele Hoogeveen

This is the fourth EEA report in a series of annual reviews of waste prevention programmes in Europe as stipulated in the European Union (EU) Waste Framework Directive.

This review focuses on reuse and covers 33 national and regional waste prevention programmes that had been adopted by the end of 2017.

Article 11 of the Waste Framework Directive states that Member States should take appropriate measures to promote reuse and preparing for reuse such as encouraging the establishment and support of reuse and repair networks. The report describes how reuse is addressed in the waste prevention programmes and provides data on the status of and trends in reuse systems in Europe. Chapter 1 introduces the concept of waste prevention in a circular economy and describes the policy background. It explains the review's approach and defines key terms used. Chapter 2 investigates the existing waste prevention programmes, looking at their scope and reuse objectives, measures and indicators, as well as the sectors and stakeholders addressed. Chapter 3 examines the status of and potential for reuse for key product groups (i.e. textiles, electrical and electronic equipment, furniture, vehicles, and buildings and building components). Chapter 4 concludes with key findings and prospects for reuse in the context of the circular economy agenda.

Munich develops a secondhand store to kickstart its local circular economy

Type of organisation or company:

Country: 
Germany

Language for original content:

Scope:

Munich has taken its ambitious waste reduction strategy to the next level by developing an innovative reuse lab and shop concept. Its Halle 2 municipal secondhand store not only enables citizens to take responsibility for living more sustainably, it also provides opportunities for job creation, educational programmes and voluntary activities.

The circular economy – a powerful force for climate mitigation

The circular economy – a powerful force for climate mitigation

Type:

Author: 
Material Economics
Publication Date: 
06/2018
Country: 
Finland

Language for original content:

Scope:

Contact: 
Sitra

This report investigates how a more circular economy can contribute to cutting CO2 emissions. It explores a broad range of opportunities for the four largest materials in terms of emissions (steel, plastics, aluminium, and cement) and two large use segments for these materials (passenger cars and buildings). The key conclusion is that a more circular economy can make deep cuts to emissions from heavy industry: in an ambitious scenario, as much as 296 million tons CO2 per year in the EU by 2050, out of 530 Mt in total – and some 3.6 billion tonnes per year globally. Making better use of the materials that already exist in the economy thus can take EU industry halfway towards net-zero emissions. Moreover, doing so often is economically attractive. Initiatives for a more circular economy therefore deserve a central place in EU climate and industrial policy.

06 Jun 2018 to 08 Jun 2018
Wascon 2018

WASCON is the reference international conference on the use of alternative materials in construction.

Making Things Last: a circular economy strategy for Scotland

Making Things Last
Publication Date: 
02/2016
Country: 
United Kingdom

Language for original content:

Key Area:

Scope:

Strategy level:

Contact: 
Colin MacBean

This strategy sets out our priorities for moving towards a more circular economy - where products and materials are kept in high value use for as long as possible.

It builds on Scotland's progress in the zero waste and resource efficiency agendas. A more circular economy will benefit:

  • the environment - cutting waste and carbon emissions and reducing reliance on scarce resources;
  • the economy - improving productivity, opening up new markets and improving resilience; and
  • communities - more, lower cost options to access the goods we need with opportunities for social enterprise.

​Realising these benefits will mean rethinking our approach to how goods are supplied, how they are used, and what happens at the end of products' lifetimes. In this strategy, we are prioritising four areas, although we will also take action elsewhere:

  • Food and drink, and the broader bio-economy: food waste is a significant source of carbon emissions; and a more circular approach to the beer, whisky and fish sectors, for example, could lead to potential savings of half a billion pounds per year;
  • Remanufacture: remanufacture is already contributing £1.1 billion per year to Scotland's economy with potential to grow by a further £620 million by 2020;
  • Construction and the built environment: construction accounts for about 50% of all waste in Scotland and is a major influence on efficient use of resources;
  • Energy infrastructure: there are considerable opportunities such as the reuse of equipment from wind turbines and decommissioned oil and gas platforms. Our ambition for waste prevention and using resources more efficiently is fundamental to achieving a more circular economy.

Pages