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Repair, reuse, refurbish

Die Oekonomischen auswirkungen einer Verbesserung des Deutschen Gewaehrleistungsrechts

Study on the economic impact of extending warranty rights in Europe

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Author: 
Kilian Bizer, Martin Fuehr, Till Proeger
Publication Date: 
09/2016
Country: 
Germany

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Contact: 
Otmar Lell

The study analysed the economic effects of the transposition of Directive 1999/44/EC concerning warranty rights, which had to be transposed into national law by January 2002. A number of publications had suggested that strengthening warranty rights for consumer goods as foreseen in the directive could increase the price level of these goods, possibly resulting in a reduced purchases. The study addressed both questions by analysing data from several EU countries. The first question was addressed by analysing inflation rates of general prices and of prices for the consumer goods affected by the directive in the time period 1998 until 2002. The second question was analysed by looking at the share of consumers who used online consumer-to-consumer markets, which were not covered by the warranty rights foreseen in the directive.

The comparison of inflation rates for consumer goods showed that inflation rates for consumer goods were below the general inflation rate between 1998 and 2004. Therefore, between 1998 and 2004 prices for the different groups of consumer goods covered by the directive did not increase but actually appear to have decreased slightly. This effect has been found for all countries analysed with no significant differences between countries transposing the minimum standards and those that went beyond. The second part of the analysis addressed the question if a developed market for online consumer-to-consumer selling of goods exists, for which the new seller's warranties weren't valid. In case of price increases for business-to-consumer markets – which have not been found in the first part of the analysis – part of the transactions could be transferred to these markets. The analysis showed that the vast majority of consumers in Western European countries used the internet regularly to purchase goods, including the online-platform Ebay. In case of increasing prices for consumer goods because of strengthened warranty rights, part of the transactions would move to online consumer-to-consumer markets rather than resulting in an overall decline of consumer goods purchases. The general conclusion was that over the analysed time period no negative impact of strengthened warranty rights on the price level of consumer goods could be found.

Sfridoo enables manufacturers to purchase and sell industrial scraps

Sfridoo

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Country: 
Italy

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Sfridoo.com is an Italian B2B publishing platform for purchasing and selling scrap materials. Using sharing economy princples to turn the circular economy into a reality, Sfridoo has already enabled more than 100 businesses to recycle and reuse industrial scraps.

26 Nov 2018 to 29 Nov 2018
CARE-electronics

The International CARE Electronics Office is pleased to announce the Going Green – CARE INNOVATION 2018 conference and exhibition on Electronics and the Environment. It will take place in Vienna's Schoenbrunn Palace Conference Centre, which is situated in the Apothecaries’ Wing of the famous building. This 7th International Symposium and Environmental Exhibition, titled 'Towards a Resource Efficient Economy', is the platform to present the state of play of sustainable development and the development of eco-efficient electr(on)ic & automotive products.

Waste prevention in Europe - policies, status and trends in reuse in 2017

Waste prevention in Europe - policies, status and trends in reuse in 2017

Cover EEA report 4 2018

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Author: 
Henning Wilts, Bettina Bahn-Walkowiak, Ybele Hoogeveen
Publication Date: 
06/2018
Country: 
Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, EU, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom

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Contact: 
Ybele Hoogeveen

This is the fourth EEA report in a series of annual reviews of waste prevention programmes in Europe as stipulated in the European Union (EU) Waste Framework Directive.

This review focuses on reuse and covers 33 national and regional waste prevention programmes that had been adopted by the end of 2017.

Article 11 of the Waste Framework Directive states that Member States should take appropriate measures to promote reuse and preparing for reuse such as encouraging the establishment and support of reuse and repair networks. The report describes how reuse is addressed in the waste prevention programmes and provides data on the status of and trends in reuse systems in Europe. Chapter 1 introduces the concept of waste prevention in a circular economy and describes the policy background. It explains the review's approach and defines key terms used. Chapter 2 investigates the existing waste prevention programmes, looking at their scope and reuse objectives, measures and indicators, as well as the sectors and stakeholders addressed. Chapter 3 examines the status of and potential for reuse for key product groups (i.e. textiles, electrical and electronic equipment, furniture, vehicles, and buildings and building components). Chapter 4 concludes with key findings and prospects for reuse in the context of the circular economy agenda.

Munich develops a secondhand store to kickstart its local circular economy

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Country: 
Germany

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Munich has taken its ambitious waste reduction strategy to the next level by developing an innovative reuse lab and shop concept. Its Halle 2 municipal secondhand store not only enables citizens to take responsibility for living more sustainably, it also provides opportunities for job creation, educational programmes and voluntary activities.

The circular economy – a powerful force for climate mitigation

The circular economy – a powerful force for climate mitigation

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Author: 
Material Economics
Publication Date: 
06/2018
Country: 
Finland

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Contact: 
Sitra

This report investigates how a more circular economy can contribute to cutting CO2 emissions. It explores a broad range of opportunities for the four largest materials in terms of emissions (steel, plastics, aluminium, and cement) and two large use segments for these materials (passenger cars and buildings). The key conclusion is that a more circular economy can make deep cuts to emissions from heavy industry: in an ambitious scenario, as much as 296 million tons CO2 per year in the EU by 2050, out of 530 Mt in total – and some 3.6 billion tonnes per year globally. Making better use of the materials that already exist in the economy thus can take EU industry halfway towards net-zero emissions. Moreover, doing so often is economically attractive. Initiatives for a more circular economy therefore deserve a central place in EU climate and industrial policy.

06 Jun 2018 to 08 Jun 2018
Wascon 2018

WASCON is the reference international conference on the use of alternative materials in construction.

Making Things Last: a circular economy strategy for Scotland

Making Things Last
Publication Date: 
02/2016
Country: 
United Kingdom

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Contact: 
Colin MacBean

This strategy sets out our priorities for moving towards a more circular economy - where products and materials are kept in high value use for as long as possible.

It builds on Scotland's progress in the zero waste and resource efficiency agendas. A more circular economy will benefit:

  • the environment - cutting waste and carbon emissions and reducing reliance on scarce resources;
  • the economy - improving productivity, opening up new markets and improving resilience; and
  • communities - more, lower cost options to access the goods we need with opportunities for social enterprise.

​Realising these benefits will mean rethinking our approach to how goods are supplied, how they are used, and what happens at the end of products' lifetimes. In this strategy, we are prioritising four areas, although we will also take action elsewhere:

  • Food and drink, and the broader bio-economy: food waste is a significant source of carbon emissions; and a more circular approach to the beer, whisky and fish sectors, for example, could lead to potential savings of half a billion pounds per year;
  • Remanufacture: remanufacture is already contributing £1.1 billion per year to Scotland's economy with potential to grow by a further £620 million by 2020;
  • Construction and the built environment: construction accounts for about 50% of all waste in Scotland and is a major influence on efficient use of resources;
  • Energy infrastructure: there are considerable opportunities such as the reuse of equipment from wind turbines and decommissioned oil and gas platforms. Our ambition for waste prevention and using resources more efficiently is fundamental to achieving a more circular economy.

Re-use before recycling of laser printer cartridges

Generic refurbishing process of laser printer cartridges

Type of organisation or company:

Country: 
Germany

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Printer cartridges are seen as a single-use product by printer and cartridge Original Equipment Manufacturers. However, most of today’s printer cartridges fall within the scope of the WEEE-2 directive.

Circular Computing - creating a more ethical, sustainable and socially responsible way to buy enterprise IT

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Country: 
United Kingdom

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Circular Computing exists to create a more ethical, sustainable and socially responsible way to buy enterprise IT

Extra life for high-end audio products

High End

Type of organisation or company:

Country: 
Germany

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Good repair services and upgrade options for end users or manufacturers in Europe provide a longer life option for all high-end audio products manufactured and distributed by the members of the High End Society e.V.

Working with Industrial Spaces to Exemplify Reuse - WISER LIFE

Rediscovery visual

Type of organisation or company:

Country: 
Ireland

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The WISER project impacts positively upon behavioural change in relation to resource efficiency and reuse principles. Through its activities WISER raises awareness relating to resource consumption and waste generation building upon pilot project activities of the Rediscovery Centre that hosts 4 social enterprises (upcycling paints, furniture, fashion and bicycles). 

Reuse and recycling of loading pallets

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Country: 
Finland

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Every year, two million renovated pallets do another tour in serving the industry. Wooden pallets can be reused again and again, and eventually a worn-out pallet will be utilised as energy for heating.

Social Innovation Repair - Giving a second life to electrical and electronic appliances, the R.U.S.Z case

Following the business model of a sustainable repair shop, R.U.S.Z is a social business which started back in 1998, as a work integration social enterprise for long-term unemployed persons.

Product life extension through remanufacturing in Europe

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Country: 
Belgium

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Following the successful completion of the European Remanufacturing Network project funded through Horizon 2020, the Conseil Européen de Remanufacture was launched in January 2017. It has members such as IBM, Lexmark, SKF, Panalpina, syncreon, Autocraft and others who pay annual membership subscriptions to develop, promote and exchange good practise between the many sectors in which remanufacturing occurs.

From waste water to RichWater, an innovative technology for combining treatment and reuse in agriculture

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Country: 
Spain

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RichWater is a EU Horizon 2020 funded project which has provided an innovative technology for wastewater reuse in agricuture. An integrated approach combining treatment and irrigation in a single system enables taking maximum advantage of nutrients.

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