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Displaying 421 - 430 of 755
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  •  Livre Blanc Systèmes agricoles et agroalimentaires circulaires
    Type
    Livre blanc
    Author
    Institut National de l'Economie circulaire (INEC)
    Groupe de Travail "Systèmes agricoles et agroalimentaires"
    Publication Date
    11/2018
    Country
    France
    Language for original content

    L'Institut national de l'Economie circulaire (France) a lancé en 2017 un Groupe de travail sur les systèmes agricoles et agroalimentaires, dont ce Livre Blanc présente les conclusions. Il explore les solutions que les orinicpes d'économie circulaire peuvent apporter pour des systèmes agricoles et agro-alimentaires durables.

    Trois thématiques prioritaires ont été sélectionnées (par le Livre blanc):

    • Systèmes agricoles et agroalimentaires circulaires: définitions, état des lieux et bonnes pratiques, sensibilisation des parties prenantes (consommateurs, professionnels, décideurs, distributeurs);
    • L'écologie territoriale appliquée aux systèmes agricoles et agroalimentaires: les synergies entre les entreprises, le niveau d’application (exploitation agricole, région, etc.), les circuits courts, l’agriculture urbaine et périurbaine;
    • Le retour au sol de la matière organique: identification des freins et leviers (acceptation sociétale, réglementation, etc.), compostage, méthanations et autres processus de transformation;
    • Valorisation des services rendus (qualité des sols, puit de carbone, approvisionnement durable…).
  • Author
    European Environmental Bureau
    Rreuse
    Zero Waste Europe
    iFixit Europe
    ECOS
    Publication Date
    06/2017
    Country
    EU
    Language for original content
    Scope

    The joint policy paper by Zero Waste EuropeECOSEEBIFIXIT and Rreuse complements Digital Europe’s publication “The Contribution of the Digital Industry in a Circular Economy” with additional perspectives, and challenges the digital industry’s conclusions with regard to policy options.

    These include an observation that the 28,000 tonnes of Category 3 IT equipment being shipped for repair or reuse annually in Europe represent only 2.2% of ICT products placed on the market, and 4.5% of the e-waste collected.

    The strategies being applied to ensure longevity in the digital industry are also insufficiently comprehensive. In practice the lifetime of many IT products is linked to that of the battery, as this has become impossible to change and its degradation thus defines the performance of the overall device.
    In response to DIGITALEUROPE, the authors believe that while repair centers organized or certified by manufacturers certainly have a role to play, the example of the automotive industry

    shows that the two systems should not be opposed.

     

    , with manufacturers required to make spare parts and information available to independent repairers whilst also offering certified repair services,

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    Destination: a circular tourism economy

    Type
    Author
    Centre for Regional & Tourism Research (CRT)
    Publication Date
    08/2018
    Country
    Denmark
    Language for original content
    Scope

    Destination: a circular tourism economy aims to increase the innovativeness of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) within the tourism sector by supporting the integration of circular economy elements into their services, products and business models. This handbook is the result of work carried out in the Interreg South Baltic innovation project, CIRTOINNO.

    In addition to providing an overall understanding of the concept of circular economy and the specificities of tourism and the South Baltic partner regions, the CIRTOINNO handbook investigates and discusses the opportunities and barriers for tourism SMEs to adopt circular economy principles, and identifies best practices. Focusing on Hotels, Restaurants and Spas, the handbook provides overall recommendations to:

    • implement monitoring systems and strategies to reduce energy and water use
    • build relationships with suppliers to rethink material flows
    • train staff to improve resource use and reduce spillage
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    The contribution of the Digital Industry to repair, remanufacturing and refurbishment in a Circular Economy

    Author
    Digital Europe
    Publication Date
    11/2018
    Country
    EU
    Language for original content
    Scope

    In "The contribution of the Digital Industry to repair, remanufacturing and refurbishment in a Circular Economy”, DIGITALEUROPE describes longstanding business practices in the ICT sector which represent, next to waste collection and treatment facilities, the circular economy backbone of the ICT industry in Europe.

    With roughly 28,000 tons of IT equipment and spare parts being shipped cross-border annually in Europe, the ICT sector is adopting circular business practices such as designing for longevity, durability and reliability, stimulating reuse, and facilitating refurbishment. There is significant market opportunity for circular economy in the ICT sector: in 2015, the business of refurbishing IT equipment already accounted for €3.1 billion in annual turnover across 2,500+ European firms.

    Alongside a series of case studies on best practice such as Nokia's Global Asset Recovery & Remarketing Services, DIGITALEUROPE outlines the following position on legislating circular economy for ICT:

    • reuse, repair and refurbishment should not be addressed under waste legislation
    • recognise authorised repair networks and protect IP rights
    • consult stakeholders when legislating ecodesign to ensure feasibility
    • ensure requirements for spare parts continue to exist
    • keep the two-year guarantee and revise consumer protection without increasing refunds / replacements
    • remove administrative burden for and regulatory barriers to shipping products for repair, reuse and refurbishment
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    Samen circulair ontwerpen: circulaire architectuur en bouw

    Type
    Author
    One Future Play
    Publication Date
    09/2018
    Country
    Netherlands
    Language for original content
    Scope

    When 68 Dutch architectural firms signed a manifesto for circular construction in 2018, it became apparent that this field is committed and eager to apply circular economy principles in designing and building for sustainable development. Nonetheless there are few available resources on commencing such a process, which is why the BNA (Dutch Association of Architects) commissioned a study on 'Designing Circularity Jointly: Circular Architecture and Construction' in 2018.

    The transition to a circular economy is a quest where nobody has the correct and precise information on what inputs are required to reduce carbon emissions, ensure raw materials are processed in a circular loop and the built environment is repurposed at end of life. Designing truly circular buildings requires frameworks and insights. These are summarised in the report's eight key messages:

    • circular economy is a shared quest full of complexity, obstacles and uncertainty, which is why openness, trust and courage are crucial;
    • architects need more circular assignments to be able to benchmark and share experiences with each other;
    • architects should play a greater role in designing buildings that can actually be built, maintained and recycled;
    • collaboration across the entire value chain is necessary to map out resource flows and design in a truly circular fashion;
    • regulation stimulates either renovation or newbuilds, becoming an obstacle when architects attempt to fuse old structures with new materials, linear raw materials with circular processes, and outdated standards with pioneering ones;
    • despite a lot of information being available, architects find it difficult to access sustainable materials that have passed the necessary quality checks;
    • the lack of clear guidelines about what is circular in the construction sector limits the adoption of corresponding principles;
    • there are no easily accessible and understandable tools to guide practitioners in designing a circular structure.
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    Documento de Posición: La Estrategia Europea sobre los Plásticos y la Propuesta de Directiva relativa a la reducción del impacto ambiental de determinados productos de plástico

    Author
    Fundación para la Economía Circular (FEC)
    Publication Date
    11/2018
    Country
    Spain
    Language for original content
    Key Area
    Scope
    Anabel Rodríguez
    Jean-Pierre Hannequart

    In this position paper, the Spanish Fondacion para la Economia Circular (Foundation for the Circular Economy), summarises the policy initiatives on plastics published by the European Commission in 2018, which includes both the Strategy for Plastics in a Circular Economy and the Proposal for a Directive on the reduction of the impact of certain plastic products on the environment.

    Outlining its position, FEC argues that:

    • the plastics strategy is based on ambiguous definitions
    • rigorous implementation of existing legal obligations in relation to plastics is a priority
    • concrete measures reducing single-use plastics require greater precision
    • a coherent policy framework for reducing microplastic is also necessary
    • uptake & depth of quality standards and technological verification should be improved
    • demand-side measures must be developed to stimulate th euptake of recycled plastics
    • a New Plastics Economy requires global action & cooperation
  • Type
    Author
    Enel
    Symbola
    Publication Date
    03/2018
    Country
    Italy
    Language for original content
    Scope
    CircularEconomy@ENEL

    100 Italian circular economy stories compiles successful innovations from companies, research institutes and non-profits across 11 sectors throughout Italy. Their stories show the transition towards a circular economy is gaining traction on the ground as a sustainable alternative to the incumbent methods of production.

    A circular economy will not happen through policy alone: it requires companies, start-ups, foundations, research centres, universities, consortia and associations to apply the principles of a circular economy to practice. This book features 100 such examples from Italy, including Aquafil's regenerated nylon yarn and Favini's non-virgin papers. The whole collection of stories ranges from across the following 11 sectors:

    • Clothing and accessories
    • Agri-food
    • Furniture / Construction
    • Industrial automation and other Manufacturing
    • Chemistry and Pharmaceutics
    • Research & Development
    • Electrics and Electronics
    • New Materials and Resources
    • Enablers and Platforms
    • Promotion and Dissemination

    ​​These 100 stories clearly demonstrate that change is underway by showing how Italian products are brought to market using increasingly integrated technologies and supply chains which exchange materials and energy. The diffusion of such circular processes will enable more and more companies to free themselves from using costly virgin resources, gradually rendering the whole economy more sustainable.

    For reference with the Italian circular economy strategy, please check the 2017 white paper "Towards a model of circular economy in Italy"

  • Type
    Author
    LE Europe
    VVA
    Ipsos
    ConPolicy
    Trinomics
    Publication Date
    10/2018
    Country
    EU
    Language for original content
    Key Area
    Scope
    Jeroen van laer

    To obtain empirical policy-relevant insights to assist with the implementation of the EU Circular Economy Action Plan, the European Commission requested a behavourial study that aimed to:

    1. identify barriers and trade-offs faced by consumers when deciding whether to engage in the CE, in  particular whether to purchase a more or a less durable good, whether to have a good repaired, or to discard it and buy a replacement;
    2. establish the relative importance of economic, social and psychological factors that govern the extent to  which  consumers engage in the CE, especially purchasing durable products and seeking to repair products instead of disposing of them; and
    3. propose policy tools to enable and encourage consumers to engage in CE practices related to durability and reparability.

    The study focused on five products: vacuum cleaners, televisions, dishwashers, smartphones and clothes. The methodology encompasses a systematic literature review, 50 stakeholder interviews, consumer focus groups, an online consumer survey with 12,064 participants, and a behavourial experiment with 6,042 participants. Whereas the survey collected information on consumers' perception of and experiences with circular practices, the financially incentivised experiments included a repairing and purchasing task.

    Findings include a general willingness to engage but little practical action to date. Consumers appear to be hampered by insufficiently developed markets for repair, reuse and refurbish in addition to a lack of information regarding product durability and repairability. Such information appeared seminal in shifting purchasing decisions towards sustainable products in the behavourial experiment, highlighting great potential to bridge the gap between theoretical and practical engagement. This experiment also uncovered substantial consistency between a self-reported circular mindset and corresponding behaviour.

    As product size and price increases, consumers also appear to have greater interest in repairability and durability. Whereas repairability is linked to spare parts, durability appears to follow from perceived product quality. Overall this study concludes that the price-quality ratio, followed by convenience, is the most important driver and simultaneously barrier for consumer engagement in the circular economy. Building on these finidngs, the study makes 5 recommendations for policy action to enhance consumer engagement in the circular economy:

    • boost CE engagement by increasing awareness of the circular economy;
    • make repairing products easier;
    • create financial incentives for repairability and durability;
    • make information on durability and repairability available at point of sale;
    • strengthen legislation requiring the provision of accurate information to consumers.
  • Type
    BOOK
    Author
    Jean-Pierre HANNEQUART
    Publication Date
    10/2018
    Country
    Belgium
    Language for original content
    HANNEQUART

    The book on Circular economy: the political and legislative ambition of the EU provides an overview of this critical evolution of EU politics and legislation.

    In its first part, the new strategic orientations informing the EU policy on the circular economy - such as eco-design of products, eco-effectiveness of the production process, durability of products, development of eco-procurement, innovative consumption, waste prevention and creation of a secondary raw material market, as well as reduction of food waste and fight against sea plastic pollution - are examined.

    In its second part, the new rules on the circular economy, particularly the EU legislation on waste management, with a special focus on reinforced prevention obligations, the ambitious numerical goals set up for recycling and the extended producer liability system, are tackled.

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    Novel ways to structure, share, manage, communicate, re-use and capitalise on multilingual Knowledge in an integrated way

    European Commission, Open Innovation 2.0 Yearbook 2017-2018, Publications Office of the European Union, Luxembourg, Caterina Berbenni-Rehm, Albrecht Broemme, 2018, pp. 38-45. Print ISBN 978-92-79-72269-1 doi:10.2759/14467 KK-06-17-006-EN-C
    Author
    Caterina Berbenni-Rehm
    Albrecht Broemme
    Publication Date
    05/2018
    Country
    Luxembourg
    Language for original content
    Caterina Berbenni-Rehm

    All what we do in life is connected with Data, Information, Knowledge and Wisdom: this is the most valuable human intangible asset because it encompasses the history, traditions, cultures, explicit and also more and more tacit knowledge, thanks also to social media. This sounds good, but such a so valuable asset and capital is very fragmented, lying unused in ‘cemeteries of information’ and is not used because it still lacks the structure, methods and instruments needed to filter and offer them in ways that brings tangible benefits to the users. The problems we are facing nowadays at global level are (i) the lack of interactive communication and a shared understanding that could make human knowledge and wisdom available internationally, as well as (ii) the ability to quickly identify the value, or non-value, of the enormous amount of data and information we are faced with. The more new technologies gather big data and large-scale information, the more we are confronted with our limited ability to distinguish between the essential, the necessary and the ‘nice-to-have’ elements of data and information.

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