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Displaying 391 - 400 of 755
Displaying 391 - 400 of 755
Displaying 391 - 400 of 491
  • CE Textile
    Type
    Author
    Morton Hemkhaus; Dr. Jürgen Hannak; Peter Malodobry; Tim Janßen;
    Publication Date
    01/2019
    Country
    Germany
    Language for original content
    Key Area
    Scope
    Franzisca Markschläger
    The concept of circular economy is becoming increasingly important in the textile industry. This study examines options for establishing closed fibre cycles in the clothing and fashion industry. It provides a detailed background analysis on fibre cycles in Europe and Germany, describes the biggest drivers and obstacles and evaluates selected technologies for textile fibre recycling.

    The analysis is based on an in-depth literature review, paired with findings from a focus group session conducted as part of the Cradle to Cradle (C2C) International Congress 2018. In addition, more than 20 experts working in the textile sector shared their candid views for the analysis.

    The study was commissioned by the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) and financed by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ).
  • CE Business Models in the EU
    Type
    Policy brief
    Author
    Interreg Europe
    Publication Date
    03/2019
    Country
    EU
    Language for original content
    Scope
    The policy brief discusses Circular Economy Business Models (CBM), gives several examples and considers the challenges and solutions facing policymakers. It makes a number of recommendations to regions to speed up the development of CBMs ‒ something this brief argues regions are in a good position to do ‒ and shares several good practices from Interreg Europe projects. It should be read in conjunction with the Interreg webinar on CBMs webinar on Circular Economy Business Models. It also briefly sketches EU policies in this area and offers some practical funding and networking tips.
  • Circular Service Platform
    Type
    Author
    Elisa Achterberg (Sustainable Finance Lab, Circle Economy)
    Publication Date
    04/2019
    Country
    Netherlands
    Language for original content

    In a circular economy, assets are no longer sold. Rather, the assets are collectively maintained by a network of stakeholders involved in the ongoing functioning of the assets - the circular service (CISE) network.

    A CISE network however requires unprecedented levels of cooperation and coordination between participants, leading to high administrative costs and the need for trust and transparency in the network. CISE networks are a totally different way of doing business, requiring different financial, legal and governance structures. Would it be possible for assets to be owned and procured by a network that creates value from them? Could this, simultaneously, reduce administrative costs?

  • Type
    Resources collection
    Author
    Ellen MacArthur Foundation
    Publication Date
    05/2019
    Country
    United Kingdom
    Language for original content

    Explore how city governments around the world are taking action to enable circular economy opportunities that deliver on a range of mayoral priorities, Sustainable Development Goals, and climate objectives. The EMF has launched Circular Economy in Cities with a global reference on the topic.

    1. Vision: What will the implementation of circular economy principles in cities look like?
    2. Factsheets: What benefits can a circular economy transition in key urban systems bring to cities?
    3. Policy levers: What can urban policymakers do to accelerate this transition?
    4. Case studies: What examples are there of urban policymakers already putting this into action?
    5. Other networks & resources: What are other organisations doing on the topic of circular economy and cities?
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    The garden, outdoor power and power tools industries have already implemented main principles of the EU circular economy policy

    Author
    EGMF & EPTA
    Publication Date
    05/2019
    Country
    Belgium
    Language for original content
    Scope
    Contact
    The garden, outdoor power and power tools industries have developed a joint position paper on the different principles of the circular economy the industries are already applying.

    Given the proximity to nature and to the natural environment, these industries are committed towards protecting the environment and are already taking measures to minimise the life-cycle impact of products in the environment addressing the following issues:
    • Design of durable and reliable products
    • Application of material efficiency and hazardous substances substitution
    • Limiting noise and exhaust emissions
    • Reparability and extending product lifetime
    • Integrating recyclability and safe waste management aspects at the design stage
    • Limiting packaging and its impacts
    • New business models
    More details on the specific measures can be found in the position paper.
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    Circular economy strategies and roadmaps in Europe: Identifying synergies and the potential for cooperation and alliance building – Study

    Type
    Author
    Giacomo Salvatori
    Frank Holstein
    Kai Böhme
    Publication Date
    05/2019
    Country
    EU
    Language for original content
    Scope
    Circular economy strategies have been under development in European cities, regions, and countries in the last few years. 33 strategies have been adopted since 2014, and at least 29 more are under development. Existing strategies were reviewed for this study, to identify similarities and differences, and to assess the involvement of civil society organisations, and potential for collaboration.

    The study argues that documents developed in the future should put more focus on including broader sections of value chains, and on ensuring inclusive partnership approaches in all phases of the strategy’s cycle. To date, circular economy strategies show different degrees of inclusiveness in terms of value chains and partner involvement. Limited inclusive approaches can be explained by the exploratory nature of most strategy documents. This includes a stronger involvement of civil society organisations in earlier phases of strategy development, and not just for dissemination and citizen involvement.

    The study highlights the role of the European Circular Economy Stakeholder Platform in gathering and sharing civil society’s knowledge and making sure it is fed into the policy cycle for circular economy.
  • Circular Economy for Beginners, Walter R. Stahel, Italian translation
    Type
    Author
    Walter R. Stahel
    Publication Date
    05/2019
    Country
    Italy
    Language for original content
    Walter R. Stahel

    The opportunities in the reuse and service-life extension of manufactured objects are fairly well documented. But a huge innovation potential lies dormant in the Circular Industrial Economy: the reuse and service-life extension of manufactured molecules.
    The latter is under-researched and under-exploited: reusing atoms and molecules in loops of highest purity, instead of recycling mixed wastes, is a challenge which involves chemistry on several levels, including the design of new molecules and mini-mill technologies to de-link existing materials. Innovative non-destructive and non-mixing collection and sorting processes will also need to be developed.
    Policy Innovation could close the invisible liability loop, by legislating an Extended Producer Liability.

  • Author
    Dr. Adriana Neligan / Edgar Schmitz
    Publication Date
    04/2017
    Country
    Germany
    Language for original content
    Key Area
    Scope
    Dr. Adriana Neligan

    Every second German manufacturing firm saves material by designing its products resource-efficiently. Although increasing digital networking in complex industrial production processes opens up new opportunities for saving resources, almost half of these firms are not digitalised yet.

  • Author
    Dr. Adriana Neligan / Edgar Schmitz
    Publication Date
    05/2017
    Country
    Germany
    Language for original content
    Key Area
    Scope
    Dr. Adriana Neligan
    This study delivers the first empirical findings on the relevance of digitisation to improving material efficiency based on the German company survey ‘IW-Zukunftspanel’.

    German manufacturing firms have up to now only rarely digitised material efficiency measures to a great extent. If they are - particularly in large companies - they tend to be used for process optimisation. Around two fifths of the companies are at least moderately digitised in relation to the most important industrial efficiency measures, namely process optimisation and the use of new techniques, but there is still more than a third that is not at all. Companies have most frequently digitised cross-company materials cycles, but this instrument is only applied by two fifths of industrial companies. There is still potential for more digitisation of measures relating to product design, materials cycle management and new business models.

    At least every other manufacturing company reuses residue and waste materials via internal circulation systems. Nevertheless, for two fifths of these companies digital networks do not play any part and in the case of a further two fifths, the part they play is minor. Only one in ten companies is heavily digitised. More than half of industrial companies use resource-saving measures that begin at the product design stage. To date, almost half of these companies are not digitally networked, or if they are, it is only to a small extent. One third of the industrial companies up to now have considered new business models as an efficiency-raising way. Of these, three out of ten have not been digitised yet with a further two fifths having only a minor level of digitisation.

    Companies that have already embedded digitisation in their strategy are frontrunners for greater material efficiency, since they more frequently use material efficiency measures intensively, are more likely to recognise further potential savings and their efficiency-saving approaches are also clearly more often highly digitised.

    From the same author, check also
    Eines von zwei Unternehmen macht Ökodesign digital
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    Innovation and Circular Economy in the Mountain Forest Supply Chain: How to Close the Loop?

    Type
    Author
    Sarah Whitaker, Euromontana
    Publication Date
    03/2017
    Country
    EU
    Language for original content
    Scope
    Euromontana
    Mountain areas face specific natural conditions, such as slope, climate, and soil types, that make the exploitation of mountain resources difficult.

    Other challenges associated with connectivity and transport make economic activity all the more challenging.

    The adoption of the circular economy will be particularly important in mountain areas which contain exceptional primary resources such as forests, water, and minerals, and provide ecosystems services such as carbon sequestration, clean water, landscapes, and recreation. Maximizing the value of extracted resources and managing them sustainably is particularly important for maintaining a high quality of life in mountain territories.The circular economy can create new economic opportunities that will provide much needed employment and economic growth in mountain areas.

    The development of the circular economy in mountain areas will allow inhabitants to benefit from resources and services available in the mountains. It will also drive the development of new approaches, for example in governance, technology, or in the building of novel tools, in so doing providing new opportunities for jobs and growth in mountain regions.

    This study focuses on the forest sector as the sector is particularly adapted to a circular approach in mountainous areas in Europe.
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