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Rapport

Consumer Insight Action Panel – Electronics Club Final Report

Final Report

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Author: 
Rosalyn Old, Leon-Johannes Reuss, Isabelle Rumpenhorst, Imke Schmidt, Raymond Slaughter
Publication Date: 
06/2022
Country: 
Germany

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This report:

  • sets out the background to the Circular Electronics project of the Consumer Insights Action Panel (CIAP),
  • shares information on the multi-stakeholder circular Electronics Club at the heart of the work, and
  • provides an overview of the methodology followed in gathering insights, designing and running interventions, and evaluating results and sustainability of the pilots.

It is designed not only to provide an overview of the project’s activities, but also to share learnings, findings and models that could support potential future initiatives in the field of circular electronics and beyond.

Discussing the Social Impacts of Circularity

Discussing the Social Impacts of Circularity

Social Impact Report

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Author: 
Rosalyn Old, Isabelle Rumpenhorst, Imke Schmidt, Raymond Slaughter
Publication Date: 
06/2022
Country: 
Germany

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Circularity offers pathways to achieve a more sustainable production and consumption and to provide benefits to society. Although sustainability entails an ecological, economic, and a social dimension, the discourse on social aspects seems to have been less prevalent than on economic and environmental ones. Hence the need to further explore the social impacts of circularity and its potential societal benefits.

The aim of this report is to frame, address and better understand questions related to the social impacts of the transition to a Circular Economy. The report synthesises the gathered insights into key emerging themes and identifies gaps or areas of potential in the field as part of the Consumer Insight Action Panel (CIAP) project, led by the CSCP and funded by Sitra and DBU.

Circularity in the built environment in Europe

Circularity in the built environment in Europe

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Author: 
Tamara Streefland
Publication Date: 
05/2022
Country: 
Netherlands

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The built environment has a huge impact on the environment. This means that it is a key lever for achieving both the goals set by the Paris Agreement and many other sustainability objectives. Activating that lever will require a long-term transformation of the entire sector.

The circular economy is a way to secure resources, limit impact and promote affordability.

The Metabolic Institute, supported by the Laudes Foundation Built Environment Programme, set out to explore the circularity of the built environment in Europe. The resulting snapshot lays out key challenges, needs and opportunities in this field.

This exploration fed into the process of shaping a new programme starting in May 2022: Accelerating the Circular Economy in the Built Environment.

Youth competencies in the circular economy labour market – A taxonomy of competencies

Youth competencies in the circular economy labour market – A taxonomy of competencies

Youth competencies
Author: 
Lowmerism OÜ, AEGEE-Europe, Common Gold, REDU - Rete Educare ai Diritti Umani, Mentes Empreendedoras, Zink! Asturias
Publication Date: 
01/2022
Country: 
Belgium

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In the research Youth competencies in the circular economy labour market – A taxonomy of competencies, 50 circular entrepreneurs across Europe were interviewed on the competences that are relevant in their work. The central question is: How should young people be equipped to shift the labour market towards circularity and sustainability?

The results provide an overview of the types of skills, knowledge and attitudes that characterise circular entrepreneurship and leadership. The study concludes with a discussion on the role of youth workers in developing these competences.

This report is the second intellectual output of the Circular Economy - Sustainable Competences for Youth (CESCY) project, co-funded by the Erasmus+ Programme of the EU.

Mapping of national status quo on circular economy and sustainability implementation generally and for youth

Mapping of national status quo on circular economy and sustainability implementation generally and for youth

Mapping of national status quo on circular economy...
Author: 
Lowmerism OÜ, AEGEE-Europe, Common Gold, REDU - Rete Educare ai Diritti Umani, Mentes Empreendedoras, Zink! Asturias
Publication Date: 
08/2020
Country: 
Belgium

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The aim of this study is to report on the status quo of circular economy and sustainable practices implementation at the EU level, as well as in Estonia, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal and Spain.

This status quo is considered from different perspectives – rules, social norms, funding, knowledge and education, knowledge dissemination vehicles and implementation of the circular economy vision – and involves different stakeholders: state (national government, regional/local government and municipalities), public companies, public and private universities, civil society, private businesses, cooperatives, association of companies and transnational corporations.

This is the first intellectual output of the Circular Economy - Sustainable Competences for Youth (CESCY) project.

The Circular Economy in Ireland

Ireland

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Author: 
OECD | Centre for Entrepreneurship, SMEs, Regions and Cities (CFE)
Publication Date: 
04/2022
Country: 
Ireland

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Ireland is at a turning point for the transition to a circular economy (CE). The 2022 Whole of Government Circular Economy Strategy provides the policy framework for the CE in this country, and the forthcoming Circular Economy Bill is expected to strengthen waste and CE legislation.

Nevertheless, with a circularity material use rate of 2% in 2020, Ireland shows significant scope for progress. This report analyses the state of play and challenges of the circular transition in Ireland and provides policy recommendations for CE policy across levels of government. It is the result of a two-year policy dialogue between the OECD, the Department of the Environment, Climate and Communications, as well as a broad range of public, private and civil society stakeholders.

New strategies for Smart Integrated Decentralised Energy systems on the way to Circularity

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Author: 
Eva Gladek
Publication Date: 
07/2019
Country: 
Netherlands

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The goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility for Smart Integrated Decentralised Energy (SIDE) systems to contribute to the resilience, flexibility and circularity of the Dutch national power system infrastructure. The energy sector plays a crucial role in tackling the challenge of transitioning into a circular, renewable energy-based economy. For this reason, the Dutch government has decided to quintuple renewable power generation by 2030.

Thanks to recent developments in renewable energy technologies such as batteries, heat pumps and solar panels, but also biodigesters in which organic waste and black water are collected providing an alternative heating source, it is now possible to produce, convert and store energy locally within so-called microgrids.

 

Research: best criteria for the new EU strategy for sustainable textiles and the Ecodesign directive

Ecodesign criteria for consumer textiles

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Author: 
Edwin Maes, Stijn Devaere & Philippe Colignon (Centexbel), Jasmien Wynants (Flanders DC), Bram Soenen & Nancy Dasilva (FOD), Tom Duhoux & Evelien Dils (VITO), Bruno Eggermont (Fedustria)
Publication Date: 
12/2021
Country: 
Belgium

Language for original content:

Evelyn Lafond Contact details

This research project lists ecodesign criteria for circular fashion and textiles.

It focused on giving consumer textiles a longer lifespan with optimal reuse potential, making disassembly and recovery possible, and exploring upcycling and high-quality recycling. Extending the life of textile products turned out to have the greatest impact in the short term. Quality seems to be the most impactful ecodesign criterion when it comes to improving the sustainability and circularity of consumer textiles as quickly as possible.

The project defined seven product categories, identifying a set of minimum criteria for each. The report looks at existing labels, standards and regulations and the authors hope it will help expand the Ecodesign Directive by adding a textile category.

Towards climate-neutral and circular procurement

Towards climate-neutral and circular procurement

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Author: 
Chandar van der Zande
Publication Date: 
02/2019
Country: 
Netherlands

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This report, prepared by the Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and Water Management, provides an analysis of the Dutch procurement system.

The Dutch Sustainable Public Procurement (SPP) approach embraces six themes, two of which are explored in this study: climate-neutral procurement and circular procurement. Included in these two themes are aspects such as CO2 and other greenhouse gas emissions, as well as the reuse of raw materials at the highest possible level of value. SPP is a highly topical issue for a steadily growing number of organisations in the Netherlands: action plans are being written, requirements and criteria are being formulated, and tools are being produced. Together, these activities are creating growing demand for instruments that evidence the impact of SPP.

Food and feed safety vulnerabilities in the circular economy

EFSA logo

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Author: 
Katy James, Anthony Millington, Nicola Randall
Publication Date: 
03/2022
Country: 
EU

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This literature review identified and categorised circular economy (CE) practices within all stages of the food and feed production chain in Europe to provide an overview of current and envisaged practices. There are four macro areas:

  1. primary production of food and feed
  2. reducing industrial/manufacturing/processing waste
  3. reducing food and feed waste in wholesale, food retail, catering and households and
  4. reducing food and feed packaging waste.

It is recommended that future primary research in novel food and feed in the CE focuses on areas other than insect farming, and that there are further investigations into the potential risks associated with importation into the EU of livestock/goods that may have been subject to different restrictions/legislation.

Learning after the flood - waste management in focus

Thinking Circular®

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Author: 
Eveline Lemke
Publication Date: 
03/2022
Country: 
Germany

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134 people died in the devastating flooding in the German region of Ahrweiler in July 2021, caused by a climate change-induced weather situation. Over 400 000 tonnes of waste were created by the floods in one night. 40 000 households were hit, and massive damage to infrastructure such as roads, schools and hospitals was reported. The situation was described as being similar to the massive destruction following a war.

Thinking Circular’s report summarises the process of waste management and learning from this regional crisis.

Decoupling Debunked - Evidence and arguments against green growth as a sole strategy for sustainability

Decoupling Debunked – Evidence and arguments against green growth as a sole strategy for sustainability

Decoupling Debunked

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Author: 
Parrique T., Barth J., Briens F., Kerschner C. , Kraus-Polk A., Kuokkanen A., Spangenberg J.H.
Publication Date: 
07/2019
Country: 
EU

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Is it possible to enjoy both economic growth and environmental sustainability? This question is a matter of political debate between green growth and post-growth advocates. Considering what is at stake, a careful assessment to determine whether the scientific foundations behind this decoupling hypothesis are robust or not is needed.

This report reviews the empirical and theoretical literature to assess the validity of this hypothesis. The conclusion is both overwhelmingly clear and sobering: not only is there no empirical evidence supporting the existence of a decoupling of economic growth from environmental pressures on anywhere near the scale needed to deal with environmental breakdown, but also, and perhaps more importantly, such decoupling appears unlikely to happen in the future.

Circular Infrastructure: the road towards a sustainable future

Circular infrastructure: the road towards a sustainable future

Circular Infrastructure

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Author: 
Rijkswaterstaat, Holland Circular Hotspot, TNO, The (Dutch) Circular Construction Economy Transition Team
Publication Date: 
01/2022
Country: 
Netherlands

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The availability of a quality infrastructure system – networks of roads, railways, bridges and waterways – is a prerequisite for all economic activity to flourish and is also paramount for people’s health, wellbeing and safety. Infrastructure is very important for human society - but its adverse environmental impact on our planet is undeniable.

To mitigate the long-term catastrophic effects of climate change and depleting material resources, a circular economy for infrastructure is crucial. The publication Circular Infrastructure: the road towards a sustainable future aims to bring this aspect into the limelight to inspire action by public actors and practitioners.

A two-year stakeholders’ consultation on the construction and infrastructure value chains

A two-year stakeholders’ consultation on the construction and infrastructure value chains

ENEA

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Author: 
ENEA
Publication Date: 
02/2022
Country: 
Italy

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This paper by ENEA focuses on circular economy in the construction sector, by illustrating the main market dynamics related to materials for buildings and infrastructures, and active and/or potential value chain collaborations in a circular and industrial symbiosis perspective.

    The paper offers an overview of:

    1. the relevance of construction and infrastructure value chains within the EU economy,
    2. their potential for circularity, resource efficiency and decarbonisation and
    3. the main barriers and levers.

    Contributors:

    Why steel recycles forever: How to collect, sort and recycle steel for packaging

    Steel Packaging

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    Author: 
    Association of European Producers of Steel for Packaging. (APEAL) Steel for Packaging
    Publication Date: 
    02/2022
    Country: 
    Belgium

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    Sector:

    Contact: 
    Steve Claus Contact details

    This report, which contains best practices and policy recommendations, provides updated information relevant to all organisations and stakeholders, both in the public and private sector, who wish to learn more about material recycling.

    The objective is to help stakeholders - throughout the whole value chain - work collaboratively to achieve APEAL’s vision of zero steel packaging to landfill by 2025.

    Steel for packaging is already the most recycled primary packaging material in Europe (2019 recycling rate: 84%), bringing great savings in emissions, resource and energy use.

    Steel’s unique inherent qualities give it a natural advantage. Its magnetic properties make it easy and economical to recycle. As a permanent material, it can also be recycled forever.

    Industrial Transformation 2050 - - Pathways to Net-Zero Emissions from EU Heavy Industry

    Industrial transformation 2050

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    Author: 
    Material Economics
    Publication Date: 
    10/2019
    Country: 
    Sweden

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    Scope:

    Karolina Vikingsson Contact details

    There is an intense debate about how to close the gap between the current climate policy and the aim of the Paris Agreement to achieve close to net-zero emissions by mid-century. The materials and chemicals that heavy industry produces are essential inputs to major value chains: transportation, infrastructure, construction, consumer goods, agriculture.

    Material Economics' study Industrial Transformation 2050 - Pathways to Net-Zero Emissions from EU Heavy Industry starts with a broad mapping of options to eliminate fossil CO2-emissions from production, including many emerging innovations in production processes. It also integrates them with the potential for a more circular economy: making a better use of the materials already produced and so reducing the need for new production.

    Circularity Gap Report 2022: five years of analysis by Circle Economy

    Circularity Gap Report 2022

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    Author: 
    Marc de Wit
    Publication Date: 
    01/2022
    Country: 
    Netherlands

    Language for original content:

    Scope:

    Lenka Homolka Contact details

    The Circularity Gap Report 2022 draws on five years of analysis to show the power of the circular economy to equitably fulfil our global needs and wants, with radically fewer materials and emissions.

    The 2022 report by impact organisation Circle Economy reveals that the throwaway global economy is fuelling the climate crisis, with more than half a trillion tonnes of virgin materials consumed since the 2015 Paris Agreement was signed.

    Circular economy solutions can have a huge impact on climate change. This is because 70% of greenhouse gas emissions are related to the production and use of products – from the buildings we live in and the transport we use to the food we eat and the clothes we wear.

    Circular Economy: Leveraging a Sustainable Transformation

    Circular Economy: Leveraging a Sustainable Transformation

    Nachhaltigkeitsrat

    It has been established that the circular economy has a high leverage effect and some progress in this field has been made, but the circular economy has yet to top the political agenda. A strategic approach to circularity is urgently needed and should be developed, managed and implemented in a cross-ministerial capacity in line with efforts at EU level and together with partner nations.

    Against this backdrop, the German Council for Sustainable Development (RNE) recommends organising the transition to circularity via a new, cross-ministerial governance mechanism coordinated by the German Federal Chancellery. RNE’s statement covers a further 13 recommendations, ranging from the need for social safeguarding instruments to expanding education and research.

    Microplastics from textiles: towards a circular economy for textiles in Europe

    Microplastics from textiles: towards a circular economy for textiles in Europe

    EEA

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    Author: 
    European Topic Centre on Circular Economy and Resource Use (ETC/CE) for the EEA (2021
    Publication Date: 
    02/2022
    Country: 
    EU

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    Awareness is increasing about the presence of microplastics in our environment and their negative impact on ecosystems, animals and people. The wearing/washing of textiles made from synthetic fibers is one recognised source of microplastics in the environment. Textiles and plastics are among the key value chains in the EU circular economy action plan.

    It is possible to reduce or prevent the release of microplastics from textiles by implementing sustainable design and production processes and caretaking measures that control microplastic emissions during use, and by improving disposal and end-of-life processing.

    This briefing aims to improve our understanding of microplastics released from textiles from a European perspective and identify pathways to reduce or prevent this release.

    Textiles and the Environment The role of design in Europe's circular economy

    Textiles and the environment: The role of design in Europe’s circular economy

    EEA

    Type:

    Author: 
    European Topic Centre on Circular Economy and Resource Use (ETC/CE) for the EEA (2021)
    Publication Date: 
    02/2022
    Country: 
    EU

    Language for original content:

    Key Area:

    Circular design is an important enabler of the transition towards sustainable production and consumption of textiles through circular business models. The design phase plays a critical role in each of the four pathways to achieving a circular textile sector:

    1. longevity and durability
    2. optimised resource use
    3. collection and reuse
    4. recycling and material use.

    This briefing aims to improve our understanding of the environmental and climate impacts of textiles from a European perspective and to identify design principles and measures to increase circularity in textiles. It is underpinned by a report from the EEA's European Topic Centre on Circular Economy and Resource Use available here.

     

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