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Second catalogue of Spanish best practices in circular economy

II Catalogue of Best Practices in Circular Economy

The catalogue of best practices in circular economy (CBPCE) is a Spanish meeting forum for the production, public, education and training sectors allowing the exchange of good practices and putting in contact different entities - suppliers and customers - who operate according to the same circular economy criteria, in order to create a network that strengthens circular value chains.

In addition, the CBPCE promotes sectoral and intersectoral connections by showcasing success stories that can be scalable and transferable between companies and sectors, thus facilitating circular growth in the economy as a whole. The call for this second CBPEC was made during 2021 and 46 circular economy practices were selected and made available to companies and the general public.

ReCreate: Innovate and develop novel technological solutions for deconstruction and reuse

Recreate

ReCreate pushes towards circular construction by investigating the system changes needed in the whole ecosystems of construction and demolition.

Circular public procurement: a framework for cities

Ellen MacArthur Foundation

Type:

Framework / Guide
Author: 
Ellen MacArthur Foundation
Publication Date: 
03/2022
Country: 
United Kingdom

Language for original content:

Scope:

This is a guide to help practitioners in a city government to adopt a more circular approach to public procurement. Public procurement processes differ from one city to another and therefore this guide is not a one-size-fits-all solution. Instead, it provides an overarching framework that should be adapted to the local context and the realities of a city.

Users are not expected to read the guide in full from beginning to end, but rather, once they have read the framework overview, to jump to the section they need by using the menu bar on the left.

Decoupling Debunked - Evidence and arguments against green growth as a sole strategy for sustainability

Decoupling Debunked – Evidence and arguments against green growth as a sole strategy for sustainability

Decoupling Debunked

Type:

Author: 
Parrique T., Barth J., Briens F., Kerschner C. , Kraus-Polk A., Kuokkanen A., Spangenberg J.H.
Publication Date: 
07/2019
Country: 
EU

Language for original content:

Key Area:

Is it possible to enjoy both economic growth and environmental sustainability? This question is a matter of political debate between green growth and post-growth advocates. Considering what is at stake, a careful assessment to determine whether the scientific foundations behind this decoupling hypothesis are robust or not is needed.

This report reviews the empirical and theoretical literature to assess the validity of this hypothesis. The conclusion is both overwhelmingly clear and sobering: not only is there no empirical evidence supporting the existence of a decoupling of economic growth from environmental pressures on anywhere near the scale needed to deal with environmental breakdown, but also, and perhaps more importantly, such decoupling appears unlikely to happen in the future.

APPLiA - Home Appliance Europe, Circular Appliances: an online platform

APPLiA

The Circular Appliances website, an initiative powered by APPLiA - Home Appliance Europe representing home appliance manufacturers from across Europe, is an online platform which takes readers through each phase of the home appliances’ lifecycle, from design to end-of-use, aimed at displaying the achievements of the sector and fostering a more sustainable culture among European citizens.

Thanks to an immersive and interactive format, the Circular Appliances website offers the public a comprehensive experience to discover each phase of the product’s lifecycle and how the home appliance industry drives the circular transition. This is all based on what APPLiA calls a “circular culture”, which means bringing all societal actors together to achieve more ambitious circularity objectives.

The Circular Economy and Green Jobs in the EU and Beyond

The Circular Economy and Green Jobs in the EU and Beyond

Type:

Author: 
Janis Brizga and Saïd El Khadraoui (Editors)
Publication Date: 
02/2022
Country: 
Belgium

Language for original content:

Scope:

The circular economy is a model of production and consumption that is underpinned by a transition to renewable energy and materials. It is a resilient system - good for business, people and the environment. The book titled The Circular Economy and Green Jobs in the EU and Beyond examines what the circular economy means, why the transition from a linear economy to a circular one is important, and how we can achieve it.

The book offers clarification on the meaning and the implications of the circular economy across different contexts – economic, social, cultural, legal and international. Particular emphasis is placed on the implications for jobs and different business models as well as on questions of equity.

Circular Cities Program Poland: Krakow

Krakow
Publication Date: 
03/2021
Country: 
Netherlands, Poland

Language for original content:

Scope:

In 2017, Poland was the third most carbon–intensive economy in Europe. The five main contributing sectors are power, industry, the built environment (mainly heating), agrifood and transport.

Poland is home to 33 out of 50 cities with the highest air quality concerns in the EU, according to the WHO. The two major sources of pollutants are motor vehicles and the burning of coal in domestic solid fuel furnaces.

Recent action by Poland's cities, governments, and local communities indicate that change is sought after. The acceptance of the circular economy roadmap at the national level in 2018 and city development strategies emphasize readiness for a transition towards a circular economy. This transition could help tackle some of the country's greatest social and environmental challenges.

Laboratorio Cartiera: leather and a social conscience!

Cartiera logo

The Italian Cartiera is an ethical fashion workshop founded in Lama di Reno, Marzabotto in 2017 which makes leather and fabric items.

Believing strongly that work is an extraordinary tool for social inclusion, Cartiera offers paths for employment and integration of disadvantaged people, mainly refugees and asylum seekers.

Circular Infrastructure: the road towards a sustainable future

Circular infrastructure: the road towards a sustainable future

Circular Infrastructure

Type:

Author: 
Rijkswaterstaat, Holland Circular Hotspot, TNO, The (Dutch) Circular Construction Economy Transition Team
Publication Date: 
01/2022
Country: 
Netherlands

Language for original content:

The availability of a quality infrastructure system – networks of roads, railways, bridges and waterways – is a prerequisite for all economic activity to flourish and is also paramount for people’s health, wellbeing and safety. Infrastructure is very important for human society - but its adverse environmental impact on our planet is undeniable.

To mitigate the long-term catastrophic effects of climate change and depleting material resources, a circular economy for infrastructure is crucial. The publication Circular Infrastructure: the road towards a sustainable future aims to bring this aspect into the limelight to inspire action by public actors and practitioners.

A two-year stakeholders’ consultation on the construction and infrastructure value chains

A two-year stakeholders’ consultation on the construction and infrastructure value chains

ENEA

Type:

Author: 
ENEA
Publication Date: 
02/2022
Country: 
Italy

Language for original content:

This paper by ENEA focuses on circular economy in the construction sector, by illustrating the main market dynamics related to materials for buildings and infrastructures, and active and/or potential value chain collaborations in a circular and industrial symbiosis perspective.

    The paper offers an overview of:

    1. the relevance of construction and infrastructure value chains within the EU economy,
    2. their potential for circularity, resource efficiency and decarbonisation and
    3. the main barriers and levers.

    Contributors:

    Why steel recycles forever: How to collect, sort and recycle steel for packaging

    Steel Packaging

    Type:

    Author: 
    Association of European Producers of Steel for Packaging. (APEAL) Steel for Packaging
    Publication Date: 
    02/2022
    Country: 
    Belgium

    Language for original content:

    Sector:

    Contact: 
    Steve Claus Contact details

    This report, which contains best practices and policy recommendations, provides updated information relevant to all organisations and stakeholders, both in the public and private sector, who wish to learn more about material recycling.

    The objective is to help stakeholders - throughout the whole value chain - work collaboratively to achieve APEAL’s vision of zero steel packaging to landfill by 2025.

    Steel for packaging is already the most recycled primary packaging material in Europe (2019 recycling rate: 84%), bringing great savings in emissions, resource and energy use.

    Steel’s unique inherent qualities give it a natural advantage. Its magnetic properties make it easy and economical to recycle. As a permanent material, it can also be recycled forever.

    Industrial Transformation 2050 - - Pathways to Net-Zero Emissions from EU Heavy Industry

    Industrial transformation 2050

    Type:

    Author: 
    Material Economics
    Publication Date: 
    10/2019
    Country: 
    Sweden

    Language for original content:

    Scope:

    Karolina Vikingsson Contact details

    There is an intense debate about how to close the gap between the current climate policy and the aim of the Paris Agreement to achieve close to net-zero emissions by mid-century. The materials and chemicals that heavy industry produces are essential inputs to major value chains: transportation, infrastructure, construction, consumer goods, agriculture.

    Material Economics' study Industrial Transformation 2050 - Pathways to Net-Zero Emissions from EU Heavy Industry starts with a broad mapping of options to eliminate fossil CO2-emissions from production, including many emerging innovations in production processes. It also integrates them with the potential for a more circular economy: making a better use of the materials already produced and so reducing the need for new production.

    The Innovation Agenda for Sustainable Use of Resources

    The Innovation Agenda for Sustainable Use of Resources

    Each year, humanity consumes resources equivalent to 1.7 planets. Sustainable resource use is therefore essential if we are to achieve our national environmental and climate objectives and the sustainable global development goals in the 2030 Agenda.

    RE:Source is a strategic innovation programme co-funded by the Swedish Agency for Innovation Systems (Vinnova), the Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning (Formas) and the Swedish Energy Agency. The programme focuses on research and innovation in sustainable material use.

    Within RE:Source, the RE:Agenda describes the innovation area of sustainable use of resources, which aims to support solutions that contribute to the efficient use of the earth’s resources within the planetary boundaries.

    Final year of the RepescaPlas Project: a complete management system for marine plastics

    Repescaplas

    AIMPLAS, the Plastics Technology Centre, has now completed the fourth and final year of the RepescaPlas project. The project has developed a complete management system for plastic waste recovered from the sea and subsequent recycling into products of commercial value.

    Recovo: linking up sellers and buyers of deadstock fabric

    recovo logo

    Recovo is a B2B platform located in Spain which specialises in selling on deadstock fabric which would otherwise be classified as textile waste.

    The platform helps EU-based brands and suppliers to give a second life to unused fabric: this reduces the amount of resources needed to meet buyers' needs and cuts down on the amount of waste to be processed. The platform uploads photos and information on fabric remnants put up for sale by producers which can then earn money from products rather than paying for waste disposal. Buyers can order samples, then buy as much of the fabric as they want which is delivered straight to them. 

    A user-friendly platform promoting circularity and combating waste!

    Circularity Gap Report 2022: five years of analysis by Circle Economy

    Circularity Gap Report 2022

    Type:

    Author: 
    Marc de Wit
    Publication Date: 
    01/2022
    Country: 
    Netherlands

    Language for original content:

    Scope:

    Lenka Homolka Contact details

    The Circularity Gap Report 2022 draws on five years of analysis to show the power of the circular economy to equitably fulfil our global needs and wants, with radically fewer materials and emissions.

    The 2022 report by impact organisation Circle Economy reveals that the throwaway global economy is fuelling the climate crisis, with more than half a trillion tonnes of virgin materials consumed since the 2015 Paris Agreement was signed.

    Circular economy solutions can have a huge impact on climate change. This is because 70% of greenhouse gas emissions are related to the production and use of products – from the buildings we live in and the transport we use to the food we eat and the clothes we wear.

    A textile evaluation by Clear Fashion: Buying less but better!

    Clear Fashion

    Clear Fashion, independant expert of garment evaluation, is a solution that informs consumers on brands' practices and clothes' impact, and enables fashion brands to communicate their scores, in order to bring more transparency in the fashion industry.

    Circular Economy: Leveraging a Sustainable Transformation

    Circular Economy: Leveraging a Sustainable Transformation

    Nachhaltigkeitsrat

    It has been established that the circular economy has a high leverage effect and some progress in this field has been made, but the circular economy has yet to top the political agenda. A strategic approach to circularity is urgently needed and should be developed, managed and implemented in a cross-ministerial capacity in line with efforts at EU level and together with partner nations.

    Against this backdrop, the German Council for Sustainable Development (RNE) recommends organising the transition to circularity via a new, cross-ministerial governance mechanism coordinated by the German Federal Chancellery. RNE’s statement covers a further 13 recommendations, ranging from the need for social safeguarding instruments to expanding education and research.

    Incubation Forum for Circular Economy in European Defence (IF CEED)

    IF CEED

    Type de plateforme ou réseau:

    Country: 
    EU

    Language for original content:

    The Incubation Forum for Circular Economy in European Defence (IF CEED) aims to apply the circularity approach of the EU Green Deal to European defence by engaging a cooperative community, including EU defence ministries, industry, institutes, research centres, financial institutions, academia and other bodies at national and international level.

    Nine working groups called "Project Circles" cover the following themes:

    1. Critical Raw Materials
    2. Additive Manufacturing
    3. Materials for Textiles
    4. Sustainable Ecodesign
    5. Waste Framework Directive Art. 9.1.i
    6. EMAS Uptake Strategy
    7. Green Procurement
    8. Circular Data
    9. Spare Parts Management.

    Based on circular economy principles, the key goal of IF CEED is to incubate collaborative projects and their respective consortia.

    Microplastics from textiles: towards a circular economy for textiles in Europe

    Microplastics from textiles: towards a circular economy for textiles in Europe

    EEA

    Type:

    Author: 
    European Topic Centre on Circular Economy and Resource Use (ETC/CE) for the EEA (2021
    Publication Date: 
    02/2022
    Country: 
    EU

    Language for original content:

    Awareness is increasing about the presence of microplastics in our environment and their negative impact on ecosystems, animals and people. The wearing/washing of textiles made from synthetic fibers is one recognised source of microplastics in the environment. Textiles and plastics are among the key value chains in the EU circular economy action plan.

    It is possible to reduce or prevent the release of microplastics from textiles by implementing sustainable design and production processes and caretaking measures that control microplastic emissions during use, and by improving disposal and end-of-life processing.

    This briefing aims to improve our understanding of microplastics released from textiles from a European perspective and identify pathways to reduce or prevent this release.

    Textiles and the Environment The role of design in Europe's circular economy

    Textiles and the environment: The role of design in Europe’s circular economy

    EEA

    Type:

    Author: 
    European Topic Centre on Circular Economy and Resource Use (ETC/CE) for the EEA (2021)
    Publication Date: 
    02/2022
    Country: 
    EU

    Language for original content:

    Key Area:

    Circular design is an important enabler of the transition towards sustainable production and consumption of textiles through circular business models. The design phase plays a critical role in each of the four pathways to achieving a circular textile sector:

    1. longevity and durability
    2. optimised resource use
    3. collection and reuse
    4. recycling and material use.

    This briefing aims to improve our understanding of the environmental and climate impacts of textiles from a European perspective and to identify design principles and measures to increase circularity in textiles. It is underpinned by a report from the EEA's European Topic Centre on Circular Economy and Resource Use available here.

     

    Towards A Circular Energy Transition

    Metabolic

    Type:

    Author: 
    Pieter van Exter
    Publication Date: 
    06/2021
    Country: 
    Netherlands

    Language for original content:

    Scope:

    Beth Njeri Contact details

    Concern continues to grow regarding the availability of critical metals. Such rare or scarce metals, like lithium or cobalt, are not only vital to the world’s major economies. They are also crucial for a transition to a renewable energy system in the Netherlands. At current levels, the global supply of these metals is insufficient, and the Dutch demand for them is no exception.

    This study Towards A Circular Energy Transition serves to provide insight into the demand for critical metals domestically over the next few decades, to offer perspectives on how to reduce this demand, and to demonstrate the opportunities these new measures present to industry in the Netherlands.

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