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Documentation et références

Dans cette section, vous trouverez les études et rapports liés à l’économie circulaire qui ont déjà été publiés.

Ces études, publications universitaires, rapports d’entreprises et autres sont transmis par les parties prenantes, les acteurs économiques ou les auteurs de ces documents. Pour proposer votre propre publication, veuillez compléter notre formulaire en ligne [EN]

61 - 70 sur 331 résultats

Ecolabel potentials of Sharing Economy Services in the Nordics

A Nordic study on the potential of ecolabels for the sharing economy

Nordic co-operation logo

Type:

Author: 
Mathias Vang Vestergaard, Jesper Minor and Dilek Turan, Minor Change Group
Publication Date: 
02/2020
Country: 
Other (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, the Faroe Islands, Greenland and Åland)

Language for original content:

Key Area:

The Nordic working group on Circular Economy and Nordic Swan Ecolabel have investigated the potential for developing ecolabels for the growing sharing economy. Their findings are set out in a Study into the Potential Framework for Ecolabelling of Sharing Based Services in a Circular Economy Perspective.

The study examines sharing economy sectors and gives some recommendations:

  • a screening model has been developed which indicates which market/business models ecolabels should focus on in future;
  • ecolabels should adopt a medium broad definition of the sharing economy, divided into its three main groups: gig, peer-to-peer and access economy;
  • ecolabels should focus on the transport sector and the entertainment business.

A framework for enabling circular business models in Europe

EEA logo

Type:

Author: 
EEA
Publication Date: 
01/2021
Country: 
EU

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Scope:

The circular economy has become a priority policy topic in Europe (EC, 2015, 2020) and is a key objective of the European Green Deal. There is increasing interest in the potential for altering traditional business models to enable materials and products to be reused and remain in the economy for as long as possible — as opposed to being used once and then discarded.

This briefing presents an analytical framework, identifying actions that can be taken to implement circular business models effectively.

Strategic Research & Innovation Agenda (SRIA) on Circular Economy

Strategic Research & Innovation Agenda (SRIA) on Circular Economy

CICERONE logo

Type:

Author: 
IVL – Alexandra Wu, Åsa Stenmarck, Jurate MiliutePlepiene, Henrik Johansson, ENEA – Roberta de Carolis, Claudia Brunori, Priscilla Reale, Cristian Chiavetta and Erika Mancuso, RVO – Antoinet Smits, GKZ - Wolfgang Reimer, Mengchun Lee, Markus Reuter, CEA - Arnaud Witomski, Sébastien Sylvestre, Jülich - Jean-Francois Renault, VITO - Dirk Nelen, Kévin Le Blevennec, Karl Vrancken, VTT - Henna Sundqvist-Andberg, IETU - Izabela Ratman-Kłosińska, WI - Bettina Bahn-Walkowiak, Carina Koop, Bluenove – Natacha Dufour, Adina Tatar, Chloe Schiellein, CKIC – Laura Nolan, Cliona Howie, LGI - Vincent Chauvet, Gabor Szendro
Publication Date: 
09/2020
Country: 
Spain

Language for original content:

CICERONE is a group of European programme owners, researchers and businesses seeking to build a platform for an efficient circular economy. Its report Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda (SRIA) on Circular Economy aims to help owners and funders of European circular economy programmes adopt a systemic approach to circular economy transition.

The SRIA was developed based on eight priority themes (biomass and biotechnologies, chemicals, construction and demolition, food, plastic, raw materials, waste and water) and builds on four societal areas that face sustainability challenges (urban areas, industrial systems, value chains and territory and sea) to identify priority areas to tackle EU region-wide issues and facilitate the circular economy transition.

Plastic in textiles: towards a circular economy for synthetic textiles in Europe

Plastic in textiles by EEA

Type:

Author: 
EEA
Publication Date: 
01/2021
Country: 
EU

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Scope:

Plastic-based — or ‘synthetic’— textiles are woven into our daily lives in Europe. They are in the clothes we wear, the towels we use and the bed sheets we sleep in. They are in the carpets, curtains and cushions we decorate our homes and offices with. And they are in safety belts, car tyres, workwear and sportswear. Synthetic textile fibres are produced from fossil fuel resources, such as oil and natural gas. Their production and consumption and handling the related waste generate greenhouse gas emissions, use non-renewable resources and can release microplastics.

This briefing provides an overview of the synthetic textile economy in Europe, analyses environmental and climate impacts, and highlights the potential for developing a circular economy value chain.

Plastics, the circular economy and Europe′s environment — A priority for action

Plastics, the circular economy and Europe's environment - A priority for action

© iStock.com/Thomas Faull

Type:

Author: 
Lars Fogh Mortensen (EEA), Ida Lippert Tange (EEA), Åsa Stenmarck (IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute), Anna Fråne (IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute), Tobias Nielsen (IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute), Nils Boberg (IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute), Fredric Bauer (Lund University)
Publication Date: 
01/2021
Country: 
EU

Language for original content:

Scope:

Plastics play an essential role in modern society, but they also lead to significant impacts on the environment and climate. Reducing such impacts while retaining the usefulness of plastics requires a shift towards a more circular and sustainable plastics system.

This report tells the story of plastics and their effect on the environment and climate, and looks at their place in a European circular economy.

The Khalifa Award Report: turning the date palm industry circular

The Khalifa Award Report

Type:

Author: 
Sandra Piesik, Abdelouahhab Zaid
Publication Date: 
01/2021
Country: 
Netherlands, Other (United Arab Emirates)

Language for original content:

Sandra Piesik Contact details

Data palms are becoming ever more important globally and in the MENA region (Middle East and North Africa). The Khalifa Award Report, inspired by 46 contributors in 21 countries, focuses on the 5 Ps - People, Planet, Prosperity, Peace and Partnerships - which shape the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

The bio-circular economic potential of the date palm industry has yet to be explored. In some cases, it is a necessity that can save lives in oases prone to fire hazards caused by climate change; it can also provide new green jobs in the sustainable economy transition. The European circular economy transition can serve as a model for adaptation in the MENA region.

More info on date palm recycling on pages 162-3 of the report.

GLOPACK: radio frequency identification can help prevent your fridge spawning furry science experiments

Glopack logo
Author: 
Viktória Parrag, Zsófia Kertész
Publication Date: 
02/2021
Country: 
France

Language for original content:

Scope:

The GLOPACK (Granting society with LOw environmental impact innovative PACKaging) project aims to come up with food packaging which has no environmental footprint and can extend the shelf life of food products.

This paper explores the applications of Radio frequency identification (RFID), a promising technology that can identify articles much more efficiently than barcodes. One of the project's areas of interest is RFID-enabled wireless food spoilage indicators linked to food date labels.

RFID technology can help reduce waste (consumers can use it to check the quality of the food in their fridge) and increase recycling (it is good for mass identifying items quickly, which is helpful in a recycling facility).

Universal circular economy policy goals

Universal CE policy goals

The Ellen MacArthur Foundation has identified five universal circular economy policy goals that provide a framework for national governments, cities and businesses to create a transition that fosters innovation and decouples growth from finite resource consumption and environmental degradation.

As governments and industries around the globe move towards a circular economy, it is key to align ambitions and collaborate effectively. The five goals provide a blueprint for cooperation and the private and public sectors need to pull together to achieve them. The goals acknowledge that the relevant policies are interconnected, which will help avoid creating a patchwork of solutions.

What is Product Environmental Footprint and how does it benefit the SMEs: results of a webinar

PEF
Author: 
Hannes Partl, Marc-Andree Wolf, Alicia Boyano, Lionel Thellier
Publication Date: 
01/2021
Country: 
EU

Language for original content:

Scope:

As part of its work on the environmental footprint, the European Commission organised a webinar for SMEs on 10 December 2020 providing an introduction to the Product Environmental Footprint (PEF) method.

The event focussed on the following questions:

  • What is a PEF study?
  • How can such a study be undertaken?
  • What are the benefits for SMEs?

The presentation, recording and a summary of the Q&A session are available for further information.

    Rijkswaterstaat: proudly engineering sustainability in the Netherlands

    Rijkswaterstaat: proudly engineering sustainability in the Netherlands

    Rijkswaterstaat

    Type:

    Author: 
    Rijkswaterstaat
    Publication Date: 
    05/2019
    Country: 
    Netherlands

    Language for original content:

    Scope:

    The Netherlands faces major challenges in the domain of sustainability. Its ambition is to create a circular economy and ultimately eliminate CO2 emissions and other greenhouse gases altogether. What does that mean for Rijkswaterstaat?

    This report contains a selection of sustainability highlights by Rijkswaterstaat (Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and Water Management). Inspiring tales of what can be achieved by making full use of everyone’s knowledge and experience, but also a fascinating description of how Rijkswaterstaat has evolved into a sustainable executive organisation for the entire national government.

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