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New Plastics Economy Global Commitment 2019 Progress Report

New Plastics Economy Global Commitment progress report launched

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Author: 
Ellen MacArthur Foundation , UN Environment Programme
Publication Date: 
10/2019
Country: 
Other (global)

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The Ellen MacArthur Foundation and the UN Environment Programme have published the first annual New Plastics Economy Global Commitment progress report. Presented at the Our Ocean Conference in Oslo, the report provides an unprecedented level of transparency on how almost 200 businesses and governments are reshaping the plastics system.

Highlights of the report include:

  • Companies set out actions to eliminate problematic plastic packaging, and increase the use of recycled plastic in packaging by more than five-fold by 2025, equivalent to keeping 25 million barrels of oil in the ground every year
  • Unilever, Mars, Incorporated, and PepsiCo announce significant reductions in virgin plastic use by 2025
  • Analysis carried out for the report shows that on average around 60% of business signatories’ plastic packaging is reusable, recyclable or compostable today. Through the Global Commitment, they have committed to making this 100% by 2025
  • Government signatories including France, Rwanda, the UK, and the cities of São Paulo (Brazil) and Austin (USA), are putting in place policy measures that include bans, public procurement, extended producer responsibility (EPR) schemes, fiscal measures, and incentives for research and development
  • The Ellen MacArthur Foundation and the UN Environment Programme call for more businesses and governments to sign the commitment and continue to raise the ambition level.

This announcement is an important step in the Foundation’s mission to accelerate the transition towards a circular economy. Launched in 2018, the Global Commitment now includes over 400 signatories, which are aligned on a path to build a new plastics economy. Business signatories, including companies representing 20% of all plastic packaging produced globally, are working to eliminate the plastic we don't need, to innovate so that all plastic we do need is 100% reusable, recyclable, or compostable, and to circulate all the plastic we use.

To find out more please visit: www.newplasticseconomy.org

Identifying the impact of the circular economy on the Fast-Moving Consumer Goods Industry: opportunities and challenges for businesses, workers and consumers – mobile phones as an example

Identifying the impact of the circular economy on the Fast-Moving Consumer Goods Industry: opportunities and challenges for businesses, workers and consumers – mobile phones as an example

mobile pone case study of circular economy impact CEPS EESC

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Author: 
Centre for European Policy Studies
Publication Date: 
10/2019
Country: 
EU

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Mobile phones, particularly smartphones, have undergone a period of rapid growth to become virtually indispensable to today's lifestyle. Yet their production, use and disposal can entail a significant environmental burden.

This study, commissioned by the European Economic and Social Committee and carried out by the Centre for European Policy Studies, looks at the opportunities and challenges arising from implementing circular economy approaches in the mobile phone value chain. A review of the value chain and different circular approaches is complemented by a scenario analysis that aims to quantify the potential impacts of circular approaches such as recycling, refurbishment and lifetime extension.

The study finds that there is a large untapped potential for recovering materials from both the annual flow of new mobile phones sold in Europe once they reach the end of their life and the accumulated stock of unused, so-called "hibernating" devices in EU households. Achieving high recycling rates for these devices can offer opportunities to reduce EU dependence on imported materials and make secondary raw materials available on the EU market, as shown in the picture below.

Drawing on the empirical findings and the analysis conducted, this study recommends policy action in the following areas:

  • Collection rates of old unused mobile phone devices are low, which means there is largely unexploited potential in the EU for recovering valuable materials from these devices.
  • Although consumers generally show willingness to engage in circular economy practices for mobile phones, in reality only a few do so.
  • Various challenges for reuse and refurbishment businesses stem from EU legislation, including regulatory complexity and "preparation for use" in the WEE directive

As such, policy-makers should close the collection gap for mobile phone devices, which could in turn create jobs in the refurbishment sector. Extending the lifetime of mobile phones can also provide CO2 mitigation benefits, particularly from displacing the production of new devices.

Policy enablers to accelerate the circular economy: Scaling up actions across regions and stakeholders

wbsd report infographic

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Author: 
World Business Council for Sustainable Development
Publication Date: 
09/2019
Country: 
EU
International

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Over the past couple of years, as companies start to understand the opportunities that lie under the concept of circular economy, the circularity conversation has gained significant momentum. At the same time, national and regional governments are developing frameworks and regulations to promote the circular economy.

Effective policymaking is crucial to accelerate and scale up circular actions in the economy. It supports businesses in overcoming hurdles by stimulating innovative projects and long-term investments in circularity, facilitating collaboration and partnerships, and producing tangible results.

Learning from successful policies can help inform future policies to promote wider actions in other sectors and regions over time.

By highlighting some representative pioneers in circular economy policy, exploring key enablers from these policies, describing how other regions could replicate these enablers and providing recommendations, this publication aims to provide insights from the policy perspective and to feed into the ongoing development of other initiatives and policies related to the circular economy globally.

Circular jobs in Belgium - A baseline analysis of employment in the circular economy in Belgium

Circular jobs in Belgium - A baseline analysis of employment in the circular economy in Belgium

KBF infogrpahic on circular jobs in Belgium

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Author: 
Circle Economy, King Baudoin Foundation, Inoopa
Publication Date: 
09/2019
Country: 
Belgium

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Contact: 
Anneke Ernon

From shoemaker to wind energy park engineer: 7.5% of all jobs in Belgium are circular. This report presents a baseline measurement of employment in the Belgian circular economy and provides insights into the nature and number of jobs in the country’s circular economy. This includes all jobs contributing to the circular economy through activities in renewable energy, repair and maintenance, recycling, digital technology, design, new business models and collaboration.

Monitoring the employment effects of the circular economy will discern what specific employment opportunities the circular economy has to offer, how these are distributed across society and how we can equip the workforce with the right skills to meet changing demand.

This report, conducted by the King Baudouin Foundation and the Dutch social enterprise Circle Economy, aims to inform governments, employers, social partners and other representatives with a view to pursuing effective and inclusive circular labour policy.

An online monitor, which the partners will update regularly, complements the report.

Completing the Picture: How the Circular Economy Tackles Climate Change

Completing the Picture: How the Circular Economy Tackles Climate Change

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Author: 
Ellen MacArthur Foundation, Material Economics
Publication Date: 
09/2019
Country: 
EU

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Renewable energy is not enough. There needs to be a fundamental shift in the global approach to tackling climate change and the circular economy can play an essential role.

Completing the Picture: How the Circular Economy Tackles Climate Changea paper published by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, tells us:

  • Greenhouse gas emissions are not dropping quickly enough to achieve climate targets and switching to renewable energy can only cut them by 55%
  • The remaining 45% of emissions come from how we make and use products, and how we produce food

Whilst the circular economy is underpinned by renewable energy, the paper concentrates on five key areas (cement, plastics, steel, aluminium, and food) to illustrate how designing out waste, keeping materials in use, and regenerating farmland can reduce these emissions.

El Dorado of Chemical Recycling, State of play and policy challenges

Zero Waste Europe

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Author: 
Zero Waste Europe
Publication Date: 
08/2019
Country: 
EU

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Over the last few years the concept of chemical recycling has been promoted by industry as a potential solution to help curb plastic pollution and waste management as a whole. This Zero Waste Europe report looks into the knowledge available as well as the state of implementation of such technologies in the European context.

Mechanical recycling is a mature industrial process, well established and expanding in Europe. Plastics cannot however be endlessly recycled mechanically without reducing their properties and quality. Besides, not all plastic types can be mechanically recycled. These limits set challenges for plastics recycling and show the need for significant improvements in the end-of-life management of plastics.

Since decades, innovators test gasification and pyrolysis for alternatives to waste to energy incineration with very limited results due to the energy balance and the environmental impact. In general, more information is needed about the environmental performance of chemical recycling technologies, as this industry is in its infancy and most plants are mere pilots. The roll-out of such technologies at industrial scale can only be expected from 2025-2030, an important factor when planning the transition to a Circular Economy and wider decarbonisation.

The right policy framework must accommodate chemical recycling as complementary to mechanical recycling while ensuring that carbon stays in the plastic, thus not being released into the environment. Therefore, allowing plastic to fuels to be considered chemical recycling risks creating a loophole in EU Climate and Circular Economy legislation.

New Plastics Economy 2019 Global Commitment Report

New Plastics Economy Global Commitment June 2019 Report logo

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Author: 
Ellen MacArthur Foundation
Publication Date: 
06/2019
Country: 
EU

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The New Plastics Economy Global Commitment unites businesses, governments, and other organisations behind a common vision and targets to address plastic waste and pollution at its source. It is led by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation in collaboration with the UN Environment Program. Launched in October 2018, the Global Commitment already unites more than 400 organisations in its common vision of a circular economy for plastics, keeping plastics in the economy and out of the ocean. Signatories include:

  • close to 200 businesses that are part of the plastic packaging value chain, jointly representing over 20 % of all plastic packaging used globally, including many of the world’s leading consumer packaged goods companies, retailers, and plastic packaging producers
  • 16 governments across five continents and across national, regional, and city level
  • 26 financial institutions with a combined USD 4.2 trillion worth of assets under management and 6 investors in total committing to invest about USD 275 million
  • leading institutions such as WWF, the World Economic Forum, the Consumer Goods Forum, and IUCN
  • more than 50 academics, universities, and other educational or research organisations including MIT Environmental Solutions Initiative, Michigan State University, and University College London.

All 400+ organisations have endorsed one common vision of a circular economy for plastics, in which plastics never become waste. As this June 2019 report shows, the number of business signatories has grown from over 100 to nearly 200 in the seven months since the launch.

A Circular Solution to Plastic Waste

a circular solution to plastic waste

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Author: 
Boston Consulting Group
Publication Date: 
07/2019
Country: 
EU

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The Boston Consulting Group (BCG) has released a report on tackling plastic waste using circular solutions, with a focus on the opportunities chemical recycling provides. After highlighting the scale of the issue, the report presents different ways of solving the plastic waste issue by comparing the impacts of different waste treatment options and technologies, such as pyrolysis. The report concludes that:

“To tackle the colossal societal and environmental issue of plastic waste, we need proportionally meaningful efforts from the private and public sectors as well as society at large that encompass behaviors and habits. The ultimate solutions will involve a combination of judicious consumption and disposal measures as well as the development of cost-competitive and environmentally friendly alternatives. Most observers would agree, however, that these changes are years away. In the meantime—over the next decade or two—we can implement circular solutions to reuse or repurpose plastic waste in the most efficient way.” (Boston Consulting Group, 2018, p. 24).

ECESP Coordination Group members contributed to this report, including Circular Change and Circle Economy.

Rapporto sull'Economia Circolare in Italia 2019

rapporto sull economia circolare 2019

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Author: 
ENEA, Circular Economy Network
Publication Date: 
04/2019
Country: 
Italy

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In March 2019, the Italian Circular Economy Network hosted a national conference on the circular economy, where it presented this Report on the Italian circular economy in 2019. Based on the methodology used, comparing the 5 most important European economies, Italy is the top performer in terms of circular economy implementation, ahead of the United Kingdom, France, Germany and Spain (in this order). While Italy’s position has remained unchanged compared to the previous year, there are some small signs of a slowdown which must be taken into account.

The report makes the following 10 proposals for a circular economy in Italy:

  • Spread and enrich circular vision, knowledge, research and good practices
  • Implement a national strategy and action plan
  • Improve the use of economic instruments
  • Promote a regenerative bio-economy
  • Integrate circular principles in public procurement
  • Promote city initiatives
  • Ensure rapid and effective implementation of the 2018 EU waste framework legislation
  • Rapidly activate an effective end of waste (EoW) regulation
  • Ensure the necessary business support infrastructure
  • Extend circular principles to e-commerce

Ecopreneur Circular Economy Update Report 2019

Circular Economy Update Report 2019

Study Ecopreneur

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Author: 
Ecopreneur.eu
Publication Date: 
09/2019
Country: 
EU

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Contact: 
Arthur ten Wolde

The Ecopreneur.eu landscape review of circular economy policy in the EU Member States aims to inspire these countries to accelerate their circular transition. Combining the EU's Monitoring Framework with other rankings, databases and reports, Ecopreneur presents 28 country profiles using a mix of quantitative data and qualitative information to highlight specific indicators. These range from waste generated per capita to voting behaviour on EU proposals on the circular economy.

The report also describes the current performance, initiatives, most relevant organisations, policies, challenges and examples of good practice for each Member State. The country profiles show 28 unique different trajectories towards the circular economy. Some countries and regions, such as the Netherlands, Scotland, Slovenia, France, Belgium and Finland, are already leading the way. Each country profile concludes with Ecopreneur’s recommendations, with the following overarching key messages for all EU Member States:

  1. Start a Green Deal on Circular Procurement
  2. Create circular “hubs” to support companies with circular models
  3. Create a national circular economy roadmap with concrete targets
  4. Improve and extend the extended producer responsibility (EPR) to cover ecomodulation of fees
  5. Introduce low VAT rates for repair services, resold goods and transactions with clearly defined social goals
  6. Create a “Green New Deal” to shift taxes from labour to resources
  7. Shift investment away from municipal waste incineration.

Circular Economy and Lifelong Learning: Scenaries - Methodologies - In action

Circular Economy and Lifelong Learning

circular economy lifelong learning acr+

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Author: 
ACR+, Zero Waste Scotland
Publication Date: 
07/2019
Country: 
EU, United Kingdom

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Contact: 
Philippe Micheaux-Naudet

The Circular Economy Competences, Making the Case for Lifelong Learning report, published by ACR+ and Zero Waste Scotland , builds on the workshop these orgnisations hosted in the Euroepan Parliament on 19 February 2019. It gathers the experiences participants shared in that workshop, and is meant to help educators, policymakers and managers of NGOs involved in training and educational organisations to promote the development of local circular economy loops.
 

The three chapters of this booklet cover different areas of the lifelong learning landscape:

  • Circular thinking in education. Educational designers will find useful insights on the promotion of circular holistic approach in schools; a bird’s eye view on how tertiary education is integrating the circular economy into its educational offer; the creation of attractive learning pathways in adult training;
  • Upskilling waste, repair & reuse industry. Policymakers and professionals in the field of vocational training will find useful references to the development of professional standards and competence profiles for the 3Rs industries;
  • Facilitating the transition towards a circular economy. The last chapter contains an analysis of the links between Industry 4.0 and the circular economy in Italy and the case history of a network of municipalities that have developed training courses to equip local authority staff for the circular transition. In conclusion, a final article analyses the possible positive correlations between entrepreneurial education and the circular economy.

No time to waste Unlocking the circular potential of the Baltic Sea Region

No time to waste: Unlocking the circular potential of the Baltic Sea Region

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Author: 
Polityka Insight
Publication Date: 
08/2019
Country: 
Poland

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The "No time to waste: unlocking the circular potential of the Baltic Sea Region" report, prepared by Politiyka Insight for the 10th annual forum of the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region (BSR) attempts to review the state of circular economy in that region, while assessing the challenges and opportunities connected with a circular transition. The report also looks into the future by trying to identify key trends that will impact the BSR countries until 2030, and on that basis project the future development of the circular economy, along with alternative scenarios.
 

The report shows that as of 2019 only Finland and Germany have adopted a circular economy strategy, while Poland, Estonia and Sweden are drafting one. On the other hand, there are circular economy projects active or planned in all countries neighbouring the Baltic sea, except for Lithuania and Latvia. According to its baseline scenario, "the transition to a circular economy will only happen partially. Cooperation between the BSR countries will remain on a roughly the same level, with EU policy as the main unifying factor. The most significant changes will be visible in the production sector".

Deutschland auf dem Weg zur Circular Economy. Erkenntnisse aus europäischen Strategien

Deutschland auf dem Weg zur Circular Economy

DE on the way to circular economy

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Author: 
Thomas Weber, Martin Stuchtey
Publication Date: 
07/2019
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Germany

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Dr. Susanne Kadner

This preliminary study stimulates public debate on the circular economy in Germany and serves as a basis for discussion within the recently launched Circular Economy Initiative Deutschland. With a sizeable industry, there is substantial opportunity for Germany to adopt circular policies, but this paradigm shift would mean no less than a reinterpretation of the "Made in Germany" model.

In the past years, both the European Union and several Member States have adopted circular economy strategies to transition to a resource-efficient economy based on keeping resources in use for longer. While countries outside Europe also follow this guiding principle in their industrial and resource policies, e.g. China, Japan or Canada, such a plan is still missing in Germany.

This report discusses the preconditions for a successful implementation of a circular economy within the German context, before discussing the experiences of European countries, which have already initiated the transformation to a circular economy by developing roadmaps or comparable strategies. The learning experiences and best practices of these countries are examined with a view to transferring some of these to Germany.
 

A long-term strategy for a European circular economy – setting the course for success

A long-term strategy for a European circular economy – setting the course for success

think 2030 circular economy cover page

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Author: 
Romain Pardo, Jean-Pierre Schweitzer
Publication Date: 
11/2018
Country: 
EU

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The concept of circular economy is gaining traction. This has led to various policy actions throughout the life cycle of a product ranging from measures on eco-design to recycling targets. Despite the progressive incorporation of the circular economy in industrial and innovation policies, the EU and Member States policies have a strong focus on increasing recycling rates, reducing landfilling and creating markets for secondary raw materials. On their own these measures are insufficient to result in a paradigm shift in resource use and current targets inadequate to provide a clear direction of travel.

Within the framework of THINK 2030, an IEEP project to support a science-based agenda for European environmental policy beyond 2020, the authors set out what policy actions the EU and Member States can and should take in the coming decade to achieve a circular shift in Europe.

Barriers & Drivers towards a Circular Economy

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Author: 
Freek van Eijk
Publication Date: 
03/2016
Country: 
Netherlands

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Contact: 
Freek van Eijk

The Barriers & Drivers to a Circular Economy report provides a review of pre-Circular Economy Action Plan studies on green growth, and showed that "a Circular Economy demands a system change with parallel actions along the value chain rather than a purely sector and/or product focused approach".

While many strategies by national and regional governments have been launched since the report's publication in 2015, its succinct overview of the issues impeding a circular transition remains useful for policy researchers. Many barriers, especially with consumer acceptance or price incentives of recylced materials, persist till today.

The Circular Economy - Challenges, Opportunities and Pathways for European Businesses

The Circular Economy - Challenges, Opportunities and Pathways for European Businesses

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Author: 
Valerio Burlizzi
Publication Date: 
01/2019
Country: 
EU

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Contact: 
Valerio Burlizzi

The Challenges, Opportunities and Pathways for European Business in Circular Economy report is a EUROCHAMBRES initiative launched in order to better understand if and how the circular economy will benefit European businesses, and to delineate a successful transition. This will be the basis for a policy strategy to contribute to an enriching debate on future legislative proposals at European level.

This report is a comprehensive meta-analysis of the most up-to-date quantitative studies on the circular economy, and elaborates on nine industrial sectors (agriculture, construction, mobility, hospitality and food services, metal manufacturing, electronics, textile, food & drink manufacturing, and plastics) including case studies. Bearing in mind the future of European manufacturing industries and businesses, the paper focuses on European trends derived from available data regarding investment costs, cost savings, and investment opportunities.

Designing plastics circulation

Designing plastics circulation - electrical and electronic products

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Author: 
Nordic Council of Ministers
Publication Date: 
08/2019
Country: 
Denmark, Finland, Sweden

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Today, most electrical/electronic equipment (EEE) is not designed for recycling, let alone for circulation. Plastics in these products account for 20% of material use, and through better design, significant environmental and financial savings could be made. Technological solutions and circular design opportunities already exist, but they have not yet been implemented. Some challenges, such as ease of disassembly, could be resolved through better communication and by sharing learnings across the value chain. Instead of WEEE, we should focus on developing CEEE: Circular Electrical and Electronic Equipment. The case examples of this report show how different stages of the lifecycle can be designed so that circular plastic becomes possible and makes business sense. It is time to take a leap in material flow management and scale up these circular solutions across the industry.

Circular Economy Guidebook for Cities

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Author: 
Piyush Dhawan, Janpeter Beckmann
Publication Date: 
03/2019
Country: 
Germany

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Contact: 
Janpeter Beckmann

In recent months there has been circular economy-related activity in cities as diverse as Maribor in Slovenia, Peterborough in the UK and Abuja in Nigeria. There is as much traction on the topic of CE in major cities of China, India, South Africa, Rwanda as there is the Netherlands and the UK. Is there no silver bullet for a city to become circular? No two cities are the same, so it is important to understand what that city’s unique selling point is and exactly what it wants to make circular.

In this guidebook, the CSCP classifies cities into four broad categories: a legacy city or a pioneering city in a developed or an emerging economy. Based on this classification, a number of examples from cities across the continents this guidebook documents the journey towards becoming more circular, and provides suggestions for cities seeking to make the shift.

The role of municipal policy in the Circular Economy: Investment, Jobs and Social Capital

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Author: 
Circle Economy
Publication Date: 
06/2019
Country: 
EU

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Harald Friedl

Local government programmes that encourage and support circular economy practices, such as repair, recycling and circular design activities help attract new investment, create jobs and result in tangible socio-economic benefits for the city and its people, reveals the report: The Role of Municipal Policy in the Circular Economy: Investment, Jobs and Social Capital in Circular Cities.
 

The report explores the connection between municipalities pursuing circular economy policy and investments in circular business that create jobs. In order to maximise circularity's benefits for society, municipalities can employ a series of regulatory, economic and soft instruments that include strategies, targets, loans and subsidies, which are all also conducive to generating employment.

WBCSD Circular Transition Indicators

Circular Transition Indicators

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Author: 
World Business Council for Sustainable Development, KPMG
Publication Date: 
07/2019
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EU

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Contact: 
Brendan Edgerton

How do we know if we’re accelerating towards a circular economy if we don’t have a common methodology for measuring distance? This distance, our transition towards a circular economy, is critical in understanding where we are today and monitoring our future progress.
 

Since June 2018, the Factor10 Working Group of more than two dozen companies has drafted, commented, pilot tested, reviewed, redrafted and refined the enclosed methodology - Circular Transition Indicators: proposed metrics for buisiness, by business - which combines a methodological framework and user manual for circular action plans in business.
 

WBCSD will also offer four webinars throughout August 2019 to present the Circular Transition Indicators, which an opportunity to ask questions and discuss the framework with the WBCSD team. Registration for any one of the webinars can be done at the link here, while feedback can be given here. After the feedback period, the Working Group will consider and process all feedback towards the next stage in the project. The final methodology and implementation tool (in development) will be published in January 2020.

Circular Baltic 2030: circular economy in the Baltic sea region and beyond

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Author: 
Joel Ahlgren
Publication Date: 
06/2019
Country: 
Sweden

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Contact: 
Joel Ahlgren - Global Utmaning

Circular Baltic 2030 - Circular economy in the Baltic Sea Region (BSR) is a report produced by the Swedish independent think-tank Global Utmaning.

It is a collection of circular economy best practices supporting the implementation of the European Union Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region and covering the EU Member States of Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland and Sweden as well as the partner countries Norway and Russia. The report also showcases a number of circular economy best practices from around the world.

Outline of the circular economy: Netherland's stocktaking report

Activities, such as reusable water bottles, are part of a circular economy

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Author: 
Trudy Rood, Maikel Kishna
Publication Date: 
05/2019
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Netherlands

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Contact: 
Trudy Rood

In many countries, governments are looking for ways to transform their economy into one that is circular, or to improve the level of resource efficiency (e.g. see the EU programme ‘Closing the loop’ or the World Circular Economy Forum).

To do so effectively, having an overview of the current state of circular activities in the economy is important. To date, such an overview has been lacking. This PBL report provides an outline of the current state of the circular economy in the Netherlands. It also provides information that may be of interest to other countries and presents opportunities and suggestions for subsequent steps towards achieving a circular economy.

For Better Not Worse: Applying Ecodesign Principles to Plastics in the Circular Economy

For Better Not Worse: Applying Ecodesign Principles to Plastics in the Circular Economy

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Author: 
Chloé Fayole, Doreen Fedrigo, Ioana Popescu
Publication Date: 
06/2019
Country: 
Belgium

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Contact: 
Doreen Fedrigo

This report examines the actual implementation of existing measures and potentially relevant new approaches for deepening the application of ecodesign principles for plastic materials and products containing plastic.

It looks at a number of sectors which rely heavily on plastic, including packaging, construction, electronics, automotive, furniture and textiles. The study assesses a wide range of criteria and tools available in horizontal and product regulations, as well as so-called soft tools such as standards, Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) schemes and the EU Ecolabel.

The report also looks at the potential of these tools for driving circularity and opportunities for extending promising solutions to other sectors.

La medición de la economía circular. Marcos, Indicadores e Impacto en la Gestión Empresarial

Measuring the circular economy. Frameworks, Indicators and Impact Management

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Author: 
Elena Ruiz , Raquel Canales, Verónica Garcia
Publication Date: 
07/2019
Country: 
Spain

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Contact: 
Elena Ruiz

Forética and the Task Force on Circular Economy*, which coordinates with 11 large Spanish companies, presented on 11 July 2019 the report "Measuring the circular economy. Frameworks, Indicators and Impact Management ".

The document analyzes the business opportunities in measuring circular economy in business management and contains a roadmap to support companies in this measurement.

This report identifies how to measure circularity in business using three different scopes:

  • the measurement of the physical flows,
  • the positive impact for companies from resources efficiency
  • impact on Sustainable Development Goals.

The report stresses the importance of carrying out a specific analysis of the "circularity" of each sector to advance faster in this transition, which will create 2 million jobs in Europe by 2030 according to estimates by the European Commission. The document includes a series of practical examples that illustrate how the Group companies measure their approach to the circular economy.

*The Task Force on Circular Economy consists of 11 large companies: Cerealto Siro Foods, Deloitte, Ecoembes, Ecovidrio, Endesa, IKEA Ibérica, ING, Nestlé, Red Electrica of Spain, Saica and Via Célere .

Read Foretica's press release

Municipality-led circular economy case studies

Publication Cover

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Author: 
Charlotte Breen, C40 Cities, Peter Vangsbo, EIT Climate-KIC
Publication Date: 
12/2018
Country: 
EU

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Contact: 
Peter Vangsbo

This publication, managed and delivered by C40 Cities, provides 40 thorough examples of practical circular economic initiatives from cities around the world, for inspiration and replications by other cities.

The Climate-KIC Circular Cities project is investigating how city governments can be transformational change agents and creators of smart and sustainable neighbourhoods.

The results are expected to improve how cities manage building, construction and utility waste and, through productively utilizing household and industrial waste streams, can increase the growing perception that what was once viewed as waste can now be viewed as resource streams.

Circular Construction in Practice

circular_construction_in_practice

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Author: 
Hubert Bukowski, Wioletta Fabrycka
Publication Date: 
06/2019
Country: 
Poland

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Contact: 
Hubert Bukowski

The report of the Institute of Innovation and Responsible Development, is the result of a collaboration between the representatives of the organizations participating in the "Circular construction in practice" debates under the Polish Circular Hotspot. It presents an analysis of the implementation of the circular model in the construction sector.

First, it identifies the causes of the current state of play, which have elevated the built environment to the top spot among the largest polluters of the natural environment.

Second, it analyses the basic barriers on the way to circular construction.

Third, it presents specific ways to reduce these barriers, with a view to making sustainable construction a reality.

Fourth, special attention is paid to specific, innovative technologies to improve resource efficiency and, as a result, improve the economic, environmental and social impact of the construction sector.

Austria Circularity Gap Report

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Author: 
Circle Economy, ARA
Publication Date: 
06/2019
Country: 
Austria

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On 19 June 2019, Altstoff Recycling Austria (ARA) and Circle Economy released the Circularity Gap Report Austria, the first measure of circularity for a nation state.

Experts and peer reviewers included CEC4Europe, the Austrian Federal Ministry of Sustainability and Tourism, the Federal Environment Agency, the Federation of Austrian Industries, the Austrian Chamber of Commerce, TU Vienna, the INZIN Institute and the City of Vienna. This landmark report paves the way for nations to lead the transition from a linear economy of Take-Make-Waste to a circular economy.
 
The analysis, commissioned by ARA, found a circularity rate for Austria of 9.7%, ahead of the figure of 9.1% in Circle Economy’s Global Circularity Gap report published in January 2019.

The Austria report will enable political and business leaders to identify and monitor the best interventions to boost the circularity rate, the proportion of materials that are recycled, re-used and re-manufactured in the Austrian economy.

This report is the first of its kind, where the circularity of a country is assessed combining different approaches. The relevance of the outcomes therefore goes beyond providing an action agenda for Austria alone.
 

Waste Management in Europe. Good Jobs in the Circular Economy?

Waste Management in Europe. Good Jobs in the Circular Economy?

Good CE jobs

Type:

Author: 
Vera Weghmann
Publication Date: 
01/2017
Country: 
EU

Language for original content:

Sector:

Scope:

Contact: 
Guillaume Durivaux

The report was commissioned by the European Federation of Public Service Unions (EPSU) to inform a workshop on "the future of the waste sector in Europe: challenges and opportunities for workers" held on 7th December 2017 in Brussels.

The report deals with the following questions:

  • What are the EU policies towards waste management?
  • What are the implications of the circular economy for the waste management sector?
  • What is the public/private provision in waste management in Europe?
  • Which multinational companies dominate the sector?
  • What are the current collective bargaining arrangements?
  • What are the opportunities and obstacles for organising waste management workers in Europe?

The report focuses on:

  • Improving the health and safety of workers
  • Ensuring quality jobs and decent pay and conditions
  • Fighting against social dumping
  • Improving the quality of jobs through up-skilling.

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