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Circular Economy in Cities: a suite of easily accessible resources

Author: 
Ellen MacArthur Foundation
Publication Date: 
05/2019
Country: 
United Kingdom

Language for original content:

Explore how city governments around the world are taking action to enable circular economy opportunities that deliver on a range of mayoral priorities, Sustainable Development Goals, and climate objectives.

In March 2019, the Ellen MacArthur Foundation launched Circular Economy in Cities, a suite of easily accessible resources which provide a global reference on the topic.

Its modules have been developed to respond to the growing interest in circular economy from city governments and mayors, and will offer insights to many other urban stakeholders, including the people who live in cities.

Circular Economy in Cities focuses on opportunities in three key urban systems - buildings, mobility, and products - and looks at how city governments can work to enable a circular economy transition.

The project addresses questions such as:

  1. Vision: What will the implementation of circular economy principles in cities look like?
  2. Factsheets: What benefits can a circular economy transition in key urban systems bring to cities?
  3. Policy levers: What can urban policymakers do to accelerate this transition?
  4. Case studies: What examples are there of urban policymakers already putting this into action?
  5. Other networks & resources: What are other organisations doing on the topic of circular economy and cities?

R-PVC Hub

Platform Type:

Country: 
Italy

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R-PVC Hub is an innovative web platform, connected to the site of PVC Forum Italia, that offers the possibility for the exchange of recycled PVC, putting in contact offers and demands. The heart of the service is an online platform on which manufacturing companies, processors and recyclers can find new business opportunities.

Circular economy strategies and roadmaps in Europe: Identifying synergies and the potential for cooperation and alliance building – Study

Circular economy strategies and roadmaps in Europe: Identifying synergies and the potential for cooperation and alliance building

Circular economy strategies and roadmaps in Europe

Type:

Author: 
Giacomo Salvatori, Frank Holstein, Kai Böhme
Publication Date: 
05/2019
Country: 
EU

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Scope:

Circular economy strategies have been under development in European cities, regions, and countries in the last few years. 33 strategies have been adopted since 2014, and at least 29 more are under development. Existing strategies were reviewed for this study, to identify similarities and differences, and to assess the involvement of civil society organisations, and potential for collaboration.

The study argues that documents developed in the future should put more focus on including broader sections of value chains, and on ensuring inclusive partnership approaches in all phases of the strategy’s cycle. To date, circular economy strategies show different degrees of inclusiveness in terms of value chains and partner involvement. Limited inclusive approaches can be explained by the exploratory nature of most strategy documents. This includes a stronger involvement of civil society organisations in earlier phases of strategy development, and not just for dissemination and citizen involvement.

The study highlights the role of the European Circular Economy Stakeholder Platform in gathering and sharing civil society’s knowledge and making sure it is fed into the policy cycle for circular economy.

Digital strategies for greater material efficiency in German industry

Digital strategies for greater material efficiency in German industry

Author: 
Dr. Adriana Neligan / Edgar Schmitz
Publication Date: 
05/2017
Country: 
Germany

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Sector:

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Contact: 
Dr. Adriana Neligan

This study delivers the first empirical findings on the relevance of digitisation to improving material efficiency based on the German company survey ‘IW-Zukunftspanel’.

German manufacturing firms have up to now only rarely digitised material efficiency measures to a great extent. If they are - particularly in large companies - they tend to be used for process optimisation. Around two fifths of the companies are at least moderately digitised in relation to the most important industrial efficiency measures, namely process optimisation and the use of new techniques, but there is still more than a third that is not at all. Companies have most frequently digitised cross-company materials cycles, but this instrument is only applied by two fifths of industrial companies. There is still potential for more digitisation of measures relating to product design, materials cycle management and new business models.

At least every other manufacturing company reuses residue and waste materials via internal circulation systems. Nevertheless, for two fifths of these companies digital networks do not play any part and in the case of a further two fifths, the part they play is minor. Only one in ten companies is heavily digitised. More than half of industrial companies use resource-saving measures that begin at the product design stage. To date, almost half of these companies are not digitally networked, or if they are, it is only to a small extent. One third of the industrial companies up to now have considered new business models as an efficiency-raising way. Of these, three out of ten have not been digitised yet with a further two fifths having only a minor level of digitisation.

Companies that have already embedded digitisation in their strategy are frontrunners for greater material efficiency, since they more frequently use material efficiency measures intensively, are more likely to recognise further potential savings and their efficiency-saving approaches are also clearly more often highly digitised.

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Eines von zwei Unternehmen macht Ökodesign digital

Innovation and Circular Economy in the Mountain Forest Supply Chain: How to Close the Loop?

Innovation and Circular Economy in the Mountain Forest Supply Chain: How to Close the Loop?

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Author: 
Sarah Whitaker, Euromontana
Publication Date: 
03/2017
Country: 
EU

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Scope:

Contact: 
Euromontana

Mountain areas face specific natural conditions, such as slope, climate, and soil types, that make the exploitation of mountain resources difficult.

Other challenges associated with connectivity and transport make economic activity all the more challenging.

The adoption of the circular economy will be particularly important in mountain areas which contain exceptional primary resources such as forests, water, and minerals, and provide ecosystems services such as carbon sequestration, clean water, landscapes, and recreation. Maximizing the value of extracted resources and managing them sustainably is particularly important for maintaining a high quality of life in mountain territories.The circular economy can create new economic opportunities that will provide much needed employment and economic growth in mountain areas.

The development of the circular economy in mountain areas will allow inhabitants to benefit from resources and services available in the mountains. It will also drive the development of new approaches, for example in governance, technology, or in the building of novel tools, in so doing providing new opportunities for jobs and growth in mountain regions.

This study focuses on the forest sector as the sector is particularly adapted to a circular approach in mountainous areas in Europe.

Circular and Bioeconomy Centre: promoting industrial symbiosis in Lapland

Kemi-Tornio's circular economy innovation platform

Type of organisation or company:

Country: 
Finland

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The Circular and Bioeconomy Centre is based on a cross-sectoral industry co-operation involving mining, metal, and forest industries and service companies in the Kemi-Tornio economic region, and accounts for about 80 % of Lapland's industrial production.

Circular Economy Club: putting the circular economy on the map, locally and globally

Platform Type:

Country: 
EU

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Contact: 
Irene Santos
The Circular Economy Club (CEC) is:
  • an international network of over 3500 circular economy professionals and organizations from over 100 countries.
  • non-for-profit, global and open to anyone willing to join the club for free.

The CEC vision: opening a new era where all cities worldwide function through a circular model, setting the end of an age of waste.

The CEC mission:
  • bring the circular economy to cities worldwide by building strong local networks to design and implement circular local strategies; embed the circular economy in the education system; and
  • help circular solutions scale.
These goals are achieved through the CEC online platform and three main programs:
  • the CEC Organizers program: for circular leaders to bring the circular economy to live in their cities, universities, hubs and companies;
  • the CEC Mentors program: for members with expert skills to give free advice to the most promising circular talent; and
  • the CEC Global events: for members to ccoperate to the solution of local and global challenges.

Circular Fashion Advocacy

circular fashion advocacy

Type:

Author: 
Arthur ten Wolde
Publication Date: 
03/2019
Country: 
EU

Language for original content:

Scope:

Contact: 
Arthur ten Wolde

According to Ecopreneur's proposal, the recommendations for advocacy messages and actions listed in this report should be used by the EU and other key stakeholders to develop a collaborative strategy and plan up to 2030 that supports a circular fashion economy.

In addition, philanthropic funders should connect and build the advocacy capacity of non-profit organisations that support the circular economy and a circular fashion sector. This is particularly important given the strong influence of lobbyists advocating for the ‘linear’ status quo.

A key message would be to urge the EU to move first to create a circular fashion economy, because it provides a huge economic opportunity, both for Europe and for producing countries; globally, overall annual benefits are estimated by Eurochambres to amount to € 161 billion.
For the fashion industry to realise the economic, social and environmental benefits of a circular economy, immediate action and longterm commitment towards advocacy are needed.

Scaling the Circular Built Environment: pathways for business and government

scaling the circular built environment cover page

Type:

Author: 
WBCSD, Circle Economy
Publication Date: 
12/2018
Country: 
Switzerland

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Scope:

Contact: 
Brendon Edgerton
Harald Friedl

The built environment, consuming almost half of the world's resources extracted every year and responsible for a massive environmental footprint, is a fundamental sector in the circular transition.The circular economy has great potential to help meet global sustainability targets and the Paris Agreement's goals in particular.
Moving towards a circular built environment involves a shift in roles and business models for stakeholders active in this sector. However, barriers related to culture, regulations, market, technology and education are slowing down the transition.

The private and public sector need to create a level playing field in order for circular materials, products and services to become the new normal in the built environment. This requires bold leadership from both companies and policy-makers who have to transform the market (e.g. by introducing new valuation methods) and implement long-term policies that encourage the scaling of circular solutions (e.g. through circular procurement). Standardization, new forms of collaboration and co-creation processes are essential elements in the transition. Digital innovation, education and information sharing can further drive the change in mindset and culture that is needed to turn the circular built environment into reality.

Flustix - Labelling plastic goods to support responsible consumption

Flustix Plasticfree & Flustix Recycled

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Country: 
Germany

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Flustix is a certification body for plastic-free and partially plastic-free products as well as goods made from recycled plastics. By making plastic reduction clearly visible for customers, the certification provides guidance and the opportunity to make a plastic-aware buying decision.

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