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Prevention of plastic waste in production and consumption by multi-actor partnerships

Prevention of plastic waste in production and consumption by multi-actor partnerships

PREVENT Waste Alliance

Type:

Author: 
Henning Wilts, Jennifer Schinkel, Lina Feder
Publication Date: 
03/2020
Country: 
Germany

Language for original content:

The study sheds light on the background of the prevention of plastic waste from packaging and disposable products by explaining the need for action, the environmental impacts and risks to human health.

Experiences of the members of the PREVENT Waste Alliance and their partners in the prevention of plastic waste by multi-actor partnerships are presented by means of 17 best practice examples.

Finally, the study gives recommendations for the reduction of plastic waste and the further work of the PREVENT Waste Alliance. These include success factors for waste prevention, necessary next steps and conclusions regarding the necessary political framework conditions.

Contributions to evaluate design investment in Portuguese agro-food industry

Circular design for circular economy

Composto organico

Type:

Author: 
Filipa Pias
Publication Date: 
05/2017
Country: 
Portugal

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How can design help the circular economy? Design is born from the need to find or adapt solutions to everyday problems.

Design is present throughout the value chain: production, location, distribution, transformation, transport, sales and user experience. Design can minimise the impact on the environment and simultaneously empower people in their habits and environmental preservation. This is done through shapes, materials, production processes, colours, legibility, concept and narratives that value what is systemic.

A design project starts by thinking about what you intend to achieve. A design collaboration (a dynamic of cause and effect) helps identify weaknesses and opportunities when it comes to adopting a circular design to each stage of the process.

Wskaźniki monitorowaniagospodarki o obiegu zamkniętymgospodarki o obiegu zamkniętymgospodarki o obiegu zamkniętym

Indicators for monitoring circular economy in Poland

Author: 
Joanna Kulczycka (editor)
Publication Date: 
10/2020
Country: 
Poland

Language for original content:

Scope:

Contact: 
Mineral and Energy Economy Research Institute of the Polish Academy of Sciences

This is the second book published by the Mineral and Energy Economy Research Institute of the Polish Academy of Sciences.

It is a collection of contributions by different authors focusing on a proposal for indicators to monitor circular economy in Poland. A large part of the work consists in explaining that circular economy is more than just waste management.

The publication is in Polish, but abstracts of the different contributions are available in English at the end of the book (from page 203 onwards).

 

Fit for a circular future: Competitiveness & Innovation

White Paper #4 - Fit for a circular future: Competitiveness & Innovation

Fit for a circular future
Author: 
CT BETA, University of Vic – Central University of Catalonia (UVic - UCC), Fondazione Ecosistemi, Italy , Regional Council of Durrës, Albania, University Consortium for Industrial and Managerial Economics (CUEIM), Italy
Publication Date: 
09/2019
Country: 
Croatia, Cyprus, France, Greece, Italy, Malta, Portugal, Slovenia, Spain, United Kingdom, Other (Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro)

Language for original content:

Contact: 
Mercè Boy Roura

The fourth Thematic Working Group (TWG) set up by Interreg MED's Green Growth community implemented and assessed solutions to promote competitiveness and innovation of Mediterranean SMEs in a circular economy.

The TWG's White Paper addresses the following issues:

  • smart specialisation, public-private partnerships and innovative funding;
  • lack of effective clusters for companies and stakeholders to connect, work together and transfer innovations;
  • limited access of SMEs to tools, services and funds driving innovation;
  • limited consumer awareness and interest in “green” and “circular” products and services.

 

 

Zero Waste: problems become opportunities

Zero waste: problems become opportunities in Waste Prevention & Management - a White Paper by Interreg MED's Green Growth community

Zero Waste
Author: 
CT BETA, University of Vic – Central University of Catalonia, Fondazione Ecosistemi, Regional Council of Durrës, Albania, Dynamic Vision, Greece, University Consortium for Industrial and Managerial Economics (CUEIM), Italy
Publication Date: 
09/2019
Country: 
Croatia, Cyprus, France, Greece, Italy, Malta, Portugal, Slovenia, Spain, United Kingdom, Other (Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro)

Language for original content:

Contact: 
Mercè Boy Roura

The third of the four Thematic Working Groups created by the Interreg MED's Green Growth community addressed waste reduction, prevention and management.

This White Paper promotes solutions to reduce organic (livestock) and inorganic waste, and maps technologies, systems, and strategies for proper waste management. It illustrates issues - e.g. over-production/application of high-nitrogen slurry and manure and need to treat it, as well as lack of treatment of agrifood waste - and highlights the projects’ contributions to achieve full use of resources through their life cycle to create a circular economy.

Among the results: policy guidelines based on four Struvite Precipitation (SP) plants to stimulate innovation and set up a common legal framework for struvite as fertilizer.

White paper 2: Green smart public services

Promoting Green and Smart Public Services within Mediterranean Municipalities to move towards a Circular Economy: a White Paper by Interreg MED's Green Growth community

Towards Circular Towns and Cities
Author: 
CT BETA, University of Vic – Central University of Catalonia (UVic - UCC) , Fondazione Ecosistemi - Italy, Regional Council of Durrës - Albania, Dynamic Vision - Greece, University Consortium for Industrial and Managerial Economics (CUEIM) - Italy
Publication Date: 
09/2019
Country: 
Croatia, Cyprus, France, Greece, Italy, Malta, Portugal, Slovenia, Spain, United Kingdom, Other (Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro)

Language for original content:

Key Area:

Contact: 
Mercè Boy Roura

The second of four Thematic Working Groups created by the Interreg MED's Green Growth community was tasked with promoting green public procurement (GPP) by which public authorities seek to procure goods and services with reduced environmental impact throughout their life cycles.

This White Paper provides solutions for GPP and addresses issues linked to the lacking integration of sustainability and circular economy criteria in GPP and the provision of public services. It also highlights the need to develop the capacity of private actors to adopt eco-innovation and green energy in order to participate in green e-tenders.

The main objective is to examine public procurement in the context of long-term impacts, with specific attention paid to the role of public authorities.

Make More With Less: Enhancing Resource Efficiency in the Mediterranean Agro-food Sector and Cities for a Circular Economy

Make More With Less: Enhancing Resource Efficiency in the Mediterranean - a White Paper by Interreg MED's Green Growth community

Make More With Less
Author: 
BETA, University of Vic – Central University of Catalonia (UVic - UCC), Fondazione Ecosistemi, Regional Council of Durrës, Dynamic Vision, University Consortium for Industrial and Managerial Economics (CUEIM)
Publication Date: 
09/2019
Country: 
Croatia, Cyprus, France, Greece, Italy, Malta, Portugal, Slovenia, Spain, United Kingdom, Other (Albania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Montenegro)

Language for original content:

Key Area:

Contact: 
Mercè Boy Roura

The first of 4 Thematic Working Groups created by the Interreg MED's Green Growth community focused on Sustainable Consumption and Production by enhancing Resource Efficiency in the Mediterranean agrofood sector, as well as in urban areas through the implementation of the Smart City Concept.

The White Paper zooms in on the difficulties that companies face in:

  • measuring their environmental footprint and resource efficiency;
  • the use of low-cost, low-tech, labour-intensive and rudimentarily-equipped greenhouses;
  • the lack of energy efficiency and renovation of EU buildings.

It then presents the projects' solutions and the benefits of resource efficiency for the environment and the economy. The projects were monitored according to the EU CEAP's indicator framework.

Cutting greenhouse gas emissions through circular economy actions in the buildings sector

Briefing

Type:

Author: 
European Environment Agency
Publication Date: 
07/2020
Country: 
EU

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Key Area:

Scope:

The briefing highlights the key findings of the background report "The Decarbonisation Benefits of Sectoral Circular Economy Actions", produced for the European Environment Agency by Ramboll, Ecologic Institute and Fraunhofer ISI.

The key messages are the following:

  • Greater circularity and more efficient use of materials present new opportunities for further reducing greenhouse gas emissions.
  • A new methodology can help to identify which circular economy actions in each sector can make the most promising contributions to meeting targets to reduce emissions and to achieving climate neutrality in Europe.
  • In the buildings sector, selected circular economy actions can lead to reductions of up to 61 % in the materials-related greenhouse gases emitted across buildings’ life cycles.

The circular economy: Going digital

European Policy Centre

The European Policy Centre’s (EPC) Task Force called Digital Roadmap to Circular Economy has explored the linkages between digitalisation and circular economy, the opportunities created by data and digitally-enabled solutions, and the challenges associated with harnessing their full potential for the transition to a circular economy.

The project represents a pioneering endeavour in exploring the interconnections between the digital and green transformations and considers the implications for EU policymaking.

The final publication The circular economy: Going digital and its executive summary show that digitalisation can offer enormous possibilities for the transition to a more sustainable, circular economy but it is essential to steer it in the right direction.

INEC publishes a study on identifying major circular economy networks in Europe

Type:

Author: 
Institut National de l'Economie Circulaire, Orée
Publication Date: 
04/2020
Country: 
France

Language for original content:

Scope:

Circular economy (CE) appears everywhere in Europe to be an adequate response to the challenges of resource scarcity. Driven by the development of the European CE Package, many initiatives to accelerate the transition are emerging, both on governmental and private levels, but they lack coordination.

In the wake of the new Circular Economy Action Plan published by the European Commission in March, the "Institut National de l'Economie Circulaire" (INEC) - member of the ECESP Coordination Group -  and Orée have co-authored a study identifying the major CE networks in Europe in order to strengthen the cooperation needed to achieve CE ambitions. By so doing they have pursued their common aim to develop and disseminate a vision of an inclusive and unifying CE.

Read the full study.

European Parliament Study on Sustainable Consumption and Consumer Protection Legislation

Type:

Author: 
Bert KEIRSBILCK, KU Leuven, Evelyne TERRYN, KU Leuven, Anaïs MICHEL, KU Leuven, Ivano ALOGNA, BIICL
Publication Date: 
04/2020
Country: 
EU

Language for original content:

Contact: 
Policy Department for Economic, Scientific and Quality of Life Policies

How can sustainable consumption and longer lifetime of products be promoted through consumer protection legislation?

This in-depth analysis investigates the contribution, or lack of contribution, of the current EU consumer protection legislation to sustainable consumption and longer lifetime of products. In addition, it gives an overview of the most relevant best practices at national and international level and provides recommendations on the future development and possible reforms of European consumer protection legislation with a view to more sustainable consumption and longer lifetime of products.

This study was commissioned by the European Parliament Committee on Internal Market and Consumer Protection (IMCO).

Promoting product longevity

Type:

Author: 
J. Scott MARCUS, Bruegel, Georg ZACHMANN, Bruegel, Stephen GARDNER, Bruegel, Simone TAGLIAPIETRA, Bruegel, Elissavet LYKOGIANNI, VVA
Publication Date: 
03/2020
Country: 
EU

Language for original content:

Contact: 
Policy Department for Economic, Scientific and Quality of Life Policies

How can the EU product safety and compliance framework help promote product durability and tackle planned obsolescence, foster the production of more sustainable products, and achieve more transparent supply chains for consumers?

Product longevity can play a useful role in achieving the Paris Agreement goals – material efficiency is an important contributor to energy efficiency and is also important in its own right. The product safety and compliance instruments available at European level can contribute to these efforts, if wisely applied.

This study was commissioned by the European Parliament Committee on Internal Market and Consumer Protection (IMCO).

2020 Report on the circular economy in Italy, with a focus on the bioeconomy

Author: 
Circular Economy Network (CEN) in collaboration with ENEA and Fondazione Sviluppo Sostenibile
Publication Date: 
03/2020
Country: 
Italy

Language for original content:

Scope:

Contact: 
Laura Cutaia
Camille Aneris

The 2020 Report on the Circular Economy in Italy, developed by CEN (Circular Economy Network) in collaboration with ENEA (Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development) and Fondazione Sviluppo Sostenibile, analyses the state of play of the circular economy in Italy with, this year, a particular focus on the bioeconomy.

The report was presented during the 2nd National Conference on the Circular Economy livestreamed on 19 Marchfrom Rome. It was introduced by Edo Ronchi, President of CEN, and Roberto Morabito, Director of the Department for Sustainability, ENEA, and President of the Italian Circular Economy Stakeholder Platform (ICESP).

For a slide presentation of the report, click on the speakers Ronchi and Morabito.

Metal demand for renewable electricity production in the Netherlands

Report on metal demand for renewable electricity production in the Netherlands

Type:

Author: 
Metabolic, Copper8 & Leiden University
Publication Date: 
12/2018
Country: 
Netherlands

Language for original content:

Key Area:

Contact: 
Pieter van Exter
Sybren Bosch
Benjamin Sprecher

For our future electricity system, a significant amount of wind and solar energy is required. In turn, these energy technologies require some specific critical metals. The current global supply of several critical metals is insufficient to guarantee a transition to a renewable energy system.

Calculations for The Netherlands show that additional wind turbines and photovoltaic panels already require a significant share of the annual global production of some critical metals.

This report outlines the magnitude of the issue and the complexity of the supply chain. It also identifies various paths towards solutions.

Circular Economy and Territorial Consequences

ESPON: CIRCTER - Circular Economy and Territorial Consequences

Circular Economy and Territorial Consequences

Type:

Author: 
Carlos Tapia, Marco Bianchi, Mirari Zaldua (Tecnalia Research and Innovation, Spain); Marion Courtois, Philippe Micheaux Naudet (ACR+, Belgium); Andrea Bassi, Georg Pallaske (KnowlEdge, Italy), Jan-Philipp Kramer, Bärbel Birnstengel, Mirjam Buck, Richard Simpson, Adriana Cruz (Prognos, Belgium); Ruslan Zhechkov, Asel Doranova, Nathan Kably (Technopolis, Belgium), Henning Wilts, Sören Steger, Meghan O’Brien, Carina Koop, Valerie Wischott (Wuppertal Institute, Germany)
Publication Date: 
05/2019
Country: 
EU

Language for original content:

Contact: 
Carlos Tapia Garcia (Tecnalia)
Marjan van Herwijnen (ESPON EGTC)

What does the circular economy (CE) mean from a territorial perspective?

This report by the ESPON CIRCTER project provides:

  1. a territorial definition of a CE based on resource consumption and waste generation intensities and trends across European NUTS2 regions
  2. a comparison with other socio-economic trends like employment dynamics and economic growth
  3. evaluation of the territorial factors most critical for CE transformations
  4. a description of the systemic mechanisms facilitating CE transitions at territorial levels
  5. an illustration of policy approaches and best practices supporting the transition towards a CE in various territorial contexts, and
  6. guidance supporting local and regional authorities in defining CE strategies.

Facts and Figures about plastic and plastic pollution: the Plastic Atlas 2019

Type:

Author: 
Heinrich Böll Foundation, #breakfreefromplastic
Publication Date: 
11/2019
Country: 
EU, Germany

Language for original content:

Scope:

Contact: 
Lisa Kuch
Lili Fuhr
Delphine Lévi Alvarès

The Plastic Atlas contains more than 49 detailed infographics covering a broad range of topics regarding the plastic pollution crisis looking along the entire value chain of plastic. The atlas highlights the scale of the crisis, and the global impacts of plastic production, consumption and disposal on other key global challenges such as human health and climate change. It also outlines the role of plastic for key industrial sectors such as agriculture and tourism and describes the corporate interests and drivers behind the plastic crisis. Finally, the Plastic Atlas presents an overview of key plastic-free regulations, zero waste solutions and a snapshot of the growing global movement working towards a future free from plastic pollution.

Exploring and evaluating Business Showcases from the Circular Economy Industry Platform

Exploring and evaluating business showcases from the circular economy industry platform

Type:

Author: 
Lukas Stumpf
Publication Date: 
11/2018
Country: 
EU

Language for original content:

Scope:

This research, part of the CEC4Europe factbook on the circular economy published in September 2018, evaluates 131 projects from the Circular Economy Industry Platform (CEIP) regarding their contribution to circular economy from both a scientific and political perspective.

Content analysis was applied to derive qualitative and quantitative information from company statements on the platform. This was supplemented by qualitative, semi-structured interviews with company representatives on selected projects. Results showed a diverse approach to circularity across the sample projects, thereby partly expanding the sectoral focus of the circular economy package.

Eco-design, eco-innovation and business models acted as strong enablers for circular actions in the sample, reflecting respective EU policies.

At the same time, sample projects heavily relied on recycling while missing out on potentially more efficient circular principles such as reduction or reuse.

High diversity in criteria was found regarding the evaluation of overall environmental impacts, with some projects using purely qualitative assessment methods, while other projects presented elaborate quantitative environmental evaluations, including significant positive impact potential. Regulatory challenges were specifically reported regarding the introduction of sound circularity quotas and targets, regarding definitional ambiguities, as well as regarding issues around unknown material compositions that currently impede recirculation.

Circular Economy in the Textile Sector

CE Textile

Type:

Author: 
Morton Hemkhaus; Dr. Jürgen Hannak; Peter Malodobry; Tim Janßen;
Publication Date: 
01/2019
Country: 
Germany

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Key Area:

Scope:

Contact: 
Franzisca Markschläger

The concept of circular economy is becoming increasingly important in the textile industry. This study examines options for establishing closed fibre cycles in the clothing and fashion industry. It provides a detailed background analysis on fibre cycles in Europe and Germany, describes the biggest drivers and obstacles and evaluates selected technologies for textile fibre recycling.

The analysis is based on an in-depth literature review, paired with findings from a focus group session conducted as part of the Cradle to Cradle (C2C) International Congress 2018. In addition, more than 20 experts working in the textile sector shared their candid views for the analysis.

The study was commissioned by the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) and financed by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ).

The Circular Service Platform

Circular Service Platform
Author: 
Elisa Achterberg (Sustainable Finance Lab, Circle Economy)
Publication Date: 
04/2019
Country: 
Netherlands

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Scope:

In a circular economy, assets are no longer sold. Rather, the assets are collectively maintained by a network of stakeholders involved in the ongoing functioning of the assets - the circular service (CISE) network. This shifts the responsibility for the functioning of an asset from the end-user to the network, thus stimulating the re-design of business processes to optimize the life-cycle performance of the asset.

A CISE network however requires unprecedented levels of cooperation and coordination between participants, leading to high administrative costs and the need for trust and transparency in the network. CISE networks are a totally different way of doing business, requiring different financial, legal and governance structures. Would it be possible for assets to be owned and procured by a network that creates value from them? Could this, simultaneously, reduce administrative costs? Could cashflows generated by the asset be redistributed to the network, leveraging the sharing of risks and returns?

Circular economy strategies and roadmaps in Europe: Identifying synergies and the potential for cooperation and alliance building – Study

Circular economy strategies and roadmaps in Europe: Identifying synergies and the potential for cooperation and alliance building

Circular economy strategies and roadmaps in Europe

Type:

Author: 
Giacomo Salvatori, Frank Holstein, Kai Böhme
Publication Date: 
05/2019
Country: 
EU

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Scope:

Circular economy strategies have been under development in European cities, regions, and countries in the last few years. 33 strategies have been adopted since 2014, and at least 29 more are under development. Existing strategies were reviewed for this study, to identify similarities and differences, and to assess the involvement of civil society organisations, and potential for collaboration.

The study argues that documents developed in the future should put more focus on including broader sections of value chains, and on ensuring inclusive partnership approaches in all phases of the strategy’s cycle. To date, circular economy strategies show different degrees of inclusiveness in terms of value chains and partner involvement. Limited inclusive approaches can be explained by the exploratory nature of most strategy documents. This includes a stronger involvement of civil society organisations in earlier phases of strategy development, and not just for dissemination and citizen involvement.

The study highlights the role of the European Circular Economy Stakeholder Platform in gathering and sharing civil society’s knowledge and making sure it is fed into the policy cycle for circular economy.

Innovation and Circular Economy in the Mountain Forest Supply Chain: How to Close the Loop?

Innovation and Circular Economy in the Mountain Forest Supply Chain: How to Close the Loop?

Type:

Author: 
Sarah Whitaker, Euromontana
Publication Date: 
03/2017
Country: 
EU

Language for original content:

Scope:

Contact: 
Euromontana

Mountain areas face specific natural conditions, such as slope, climate, and soil types, that make the exploitation of mountain resources difficult.

Other challenges associated with connectivity and transport make economic activity all the more challenging.

The adoption of the circular economy will be particularly important in mountain areas which contain exceptional primary resources such as forests, water, and minerals, and provide ecosystems services such as carbon sequestration, clean water, landscapes, and recreation. Maximizing the value of extracted resources and managing them sustainably is particularly important for maintaining a high quality of life in mountain territories.The circular economy can create new economic opportunities that will provide much needed employment and economic growth in mountain areas.

The development of the circular economy in mountain areas will allow inhabitants to benefit from resources and services available in the mountains. It will also drive the development of new approaches, for example in governance, technology, or in the building of novel tools, in so doing providing new opportunities for jobs and growth in mountain regions.

This study focuses on the forest sector as the sector is particularly adapted to a circular approach in mountainous areas in Europe.

Slovenian companies and a circular economy: Slovenian Business Observatory 2017

Slovenian companies and the circular economy

Slovenian entrepreneur observatory

Type:

Author: 
Karin Širec, Barbara Bradač Hojnik, Matjaž Denac, Dijana Močnik
Publication Date: 
03/2018
Country: 
Slovenia

Language for original content:

Scope:

Contact: 
Barbara Bradač Hojnik

Since 2000, the “Slovenian Entrepreneurship Observatory” publishes a report annually providing analysis of the situation of Slovenian companies and insight into Slovenian entrepreneurship. In 2018 this report had a thematic focus on the circular economy (CE), with the authors centring in on the drivers and barriers to SMEs integrating CE into business practice.

This report first provides a theoretical framework for the CE, which aims to raise awareness and facilitate information exchange between companies and individuals looking to spread circular innovation. Simultaneously this report also provides an overview of the barriers companies face in transitioning towards circularity, which include a lack of comparable indicators to benchmark and track progress; cost of eco-design; administrative burden; access to finance and a lack of awareness about the concept itself: in 2017, a survey of businesses indicated only 32% had some understanding of what a circular economy is. This survey also revealed businesses perceive economic, environmental and regulatory opportunities as the main drivers towards circularity.

The report concludes with practical aspects of CE implementation at the level of enterprises, presenting a case study which highlights the situation and the possible use of eco-design in Slovenian SMEs operating in the construction sector and conclusions with recommended steps to overcome the barriers identified.

Economía Circular y Empleabilidad de los Jóvenes en la Comunidad de Madrid

Circular Economy and Youth Employability in the Comunidad de Madrid
Author: 
Eva Ramón, Franco Llobera, Manuel Redondo
Publication Date: 
04/2018
Country: 
Spain

Language for original content:

Scope:

Contact: 
Eva Ramón

The Centro de Documentación Europea de la Universidad Francisco de Vitoria (European Documentation Centre, UFV) has completed a project titled Economía Circular y Empleabilidad de los Jóvenes en la Comunidad de Madrid (Circular Economy and Employability of Young People in the Autonomous Region of Madrid).

The outcomes include a report on communicating the circular economy through the lens of employment opportunities circular business models provide for young people. The project has also created a guide on communicating the circular economy to students, which introduces the subject, presents the 7R model and shows how innovative companies provide opportunities for employment in circular business.

Retaining value in the Swedish materials system - summary of the report in English

Retaining value in the Swedish materials system

Retaining value in the swedish materials system

Type:

Author: 
Material Economics
Publication Date: 
01/2018
Country: 
Sweden

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Sector:

Scope:

Contact: 
Per Klevnäs
Angelica Afzelius

The report Retaining value in the Swedish materials system takes a value perspective on the use and recycling of materials in a circular perspective. It analyses the use of materials in the Swedish economy in monetary terms instead of tonnes and cubic metres.

The key questions it seeks to answer include the following:

  • For each 100 SEK of raw material entering the Swedish economy, how much value is retained after one use cycle?
  • What are the main reasons that material value is lost?
  • What measures could retain more materials value, and how much could be recovered? Which business opportunities arise as a result?

This value perspective gives a much more realistic view of how circular the Swedish materials system really is, as it captures all the downgrading effects that occur through its use of materials, in addition to the volume effects that also traditional research approaches capture. The value perspective also turns materials recycling into an industrial innovation and an economic topic, in addition to an environmental topic. To our knowledge, this is the first time anyone has value-mapped a material system in this way. 

Read more about the results and download the full report (in Swedish) here.

Samen circulair ontwerpen: circulaire architectuur en bouw

Samen circulair ontwerpen: circulaire architectuur en bouw

bna report logo

Type:

Author: 
One Future Play
Publication Date: 
09/2018
Country: 
Netherlands

Language for original content:

Scope:

When 68 Dutch architectural firms signed a manifesto for circular construction in 2018, it became apparent that this field is committed and eager to apply circular economy principles in designing and building for sustainable development. Nonetheless there are few available resources on commencing such a process, which is why the BNA (Dutch Association of Architects) commissioned a study on 'Designing Circularity Jointly: Circular Architecture and Construction' in 2018.

The transition to a circular economy is a quest where nobody has the correct and precise information on what inputs are required to reduce carbon emissions, ensure raw materials are processed in a circular loop and the built environment is repurposed at end of life. Designing truly circular buildings requires frameworks and insights. These are summarised in the report's eight key messages:

  • circular economy is a shared quest full of complexity, obstacles and uncertainty, which is why openness, trust and courage are crucial;
  • architects need more circular assignments to be able to benchmark and share experiences with each other;
  • architects should play a greater role in designing buildings that can actually be built, maintained and recycled;
  • collaboration across the entire value chain is necessary to map out resource flows and design in a truly circular fashion;
  • regulation stimulates either renovation or newbuilds, becoming an obstacle when architects attempt to fuse old structures with new materials, linear raw materials with circular processes, and outdated standards with pioneering ones;
  • despite a lot of information being available, architects find it difficult to access sustainable materials that have passed the necessary quality checks;
  • the lack of clear guidelines about what is circular in the construction sector limits the adoption of corresponding principles;
  • there are no easily accessible and understandable tools to guide practitioners in designing a circular structure.

Les indicateurs de l'économie circulaire pour les entreprises

Les indicateurs de l'économie circulaire pour les entreprises

Les indicateurs de l'économie circulaire pour les entreprises

Type:

Study
Author: 
Emmanuelle Moesch et Carlota Vicente (INEC), David Laurent (EpE)
Publication Date: 
11/2018
Country: 
France
France

Language for original content:

French
All sectors

Scope:

EU

Selon le Programme des Nations Unies pour l’Environnement, la consommation globale de ressources pourrait plus que doubler entre 2015 et 2050, mettant sous très forte pression les capacités planétaires. L’économie circulaire serait susceptible d’être une des réponses à l’épuisement des ressources et aux pressions sur l’environnement – pollution, destruction de la biodiversité.

Les entreprises sont de plus en plus nombreuses à explorer de nouveaux modèles d’affaires intégrant les principes de l’économie circulaire. Or, pour piloter leurs démarches et leurs stratégies, elles ont un besoin croissant d’indicateurs pour mesurer leur degré de circularité et ses effets sur l’environnement.

Pour les orienter, les membres d’Entreprises pour l’Environnement (EpE) et de l’Institut National de l’Economie Circulaire (INEC) ont réalisé cette publication commune.

Market study on date marking and other information provided on food labels and food waste prevention

Market study on date marking and other information provided on food labels and food waste prevention

Best before - illustration

Type:

Author: 
European Commission
Publication Date: 
01/2018
Country: 
EU

Language for original content:

Scope:

Contact: 
Sante Food Waste

As part of the Circular Economy Action Plan, the Commission is examining ways to improve the use of date marking by actors in the food chain and its understanding by consumers, in particular "best before" labelling. Better understanding and use of date marking on food, i.e. "use by" and "best before" dates, by all actors concerned, can prevent and reduce food waste in the EU.

In order to help inform its work on date marking, the Commission launched a study to map how date marking is used in the market by food business operators and control authorities.

The market study found wide variation in date marking practices within product categories surveyed in the EU. The legibility of date marks was judged to be poor for 11% of products sampled. The study highlights the role that strengthened cooperation and innovation in the food supply chain can play in preventing food waste and finds that additional guidance may be needed to facilitate food redistribution past the "best before" date.

Based on the study's findings, the authors conclude that avoidable food waste linked to date marking is likely to be reduced where:

  • a date mark is present, its meaning is clear and it is legible;
  • consumers have a good understanding of the meaning of date marking (and the difference between "use by" as an indicator of safety and "best before" as an indicator of quality); 
  • "use by" dates are used only where there is a safety-based rationale for doing so, consistent with the Regulation on Food Information to Consumers
  • the product life stated on the packaging is consistent with the findings of safety and quality tests, and is not shortened unnecessarily by other considerations, such as product marketing;
  • storage and open life guidance are consistent with the findings of safety and quality tests;
  • there is a level of consistency in storage of food at retail and guidance for consumers regarding the temperatures at which products should be stored in the home.

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