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EU Guidelines for the feed use of food no longer intended for human consumption

EU guidelines facilitate the feed use of certain food no longer intended for human consumption

Animal feed
Author: 
European Commission
Publication Date: 
04/2018
Country: 
EU

Language for original content:

Scope:

Contact: 
Sante Food Waste

The EU Guidelines for the feed use of food no longer intended for human consumption are an integral part of the communication Closing the loop - An EU action plan for the Circular Economy.

They were developed by the Commission in close cooperation with the food, feed, animal health and environmental authorities of the Member States and the members of the EU Platform on Food Losses and Food Waste, as well as other stakeholders.

The valorisation of the nutrients of food which, for commercial reasons or owing to problems of manufacturing,  is no longer intended for human consumption, but can be safely used in animal nutrition, prevents these materials from being composted, transformed in biogas or disposed of by incineration or landfilling.

Available in all EU languages by following the Official Journal link, these guidelines should assist the national and local competent authorities, as well as the operators in the food chain, in applying the relevant EU legislation. Legal clarity is therefore enhanced and examples of best practices that are in compliance with the current EU regulatory framework are presented while preventing unnecessary administrative burden.

3rd Circular Change Conference: Unfolding Circular Economy Roadmaps

Start/End date: 
10/05/2018 to 11/05/2018
Country: 
Slovenia
City: 
Kostanjevica na Krki and Maribor

Coordination Group activity type:

Abstract: 

The first Slovenian Circular Economy Roadmap paves the way towards a circular economy in Slovenia.

Market study on date marking and other information provided on food labels and food waste prevention

Market study on date marking and other information provided on food labels and food waste prevention

Best before - illustration

Type:

Author: 
European Commission
Publication Date: 
01/2018
Country: 
EU

Language for original content:

Scope:

Contact: 
Sante Food Waste

As part of the Circular Economy Action Plan, the Commission is examining ways to improve the use of date marking by actors in the food chain and its understanding by consumers, in particular "best before" labelling. Better understanding and use of date marking on food, i.e. "use by" and "best before" dates, by all actors concerned, can prevent and reduce food waste in the EU.

In order to help inform its work on date marking, the Commission launched a study to map how date marking is used in the market by food business operators and control authorities.

The market study found wide variation in date marking practices within product categories surveyed in the EU. The legibility of date marks was judged to be poor for 11% of products sampled. The study highlights the role that strengthened cooperation and innovation in the food supply chain can play in preventing food waste and finds that additional guidance may be needed to facilitate food redistribution past the "best before" date.

Based on the study's findings, the authors conclude that avoidable food waste linked to date marking is likely to be reduced where:

  • a date mark is present, its meaning is clear and it is legible;
  • consumers have a good understanding of the meaning of date marking (and the difference between "use by" as an indicator of safety and "best before" as an indicator of quality); 
  • "use by" dates are used only where there is a safety-based rationale for doing so, consistent with the Regulation on Food Information to Consumers
  • the product life stated on the packaging is consistent with the findings of safety and quality tests, and is not shortened unnecessarily by other considerations, such as product marketing;
  • storage and open life guidance are consistent with the findings of safety and quality tests;
  • there is a level of consistency in storage of food at retail and guidance for consumers regarding the temperatures at which products should be stored in the home.

EU guidelines on food donation

Food donation
Author: 
European Commission
Publication Date: 
10/2017
Country: 
EU

Language for original content:

Scope:

Contact: 
Sante Food Waste

As part of the Circular Economy Action Plan, the Commission has adopted EU food donation guidelines in order to facilitate the recovery and redistribution of safe, edible food to those in need.

Developed in consultation with the EU Platform on Food Losses and Food Waste, the EU food donation guidelines seek to:

  • facilitate compliance of providers and recipients of surplus food with relevant requirements laid down in the EU regulatory framework (e.g. food safety, food hygiene, traceability, liability, VAT, etc.);
  • promote common interpretation by regulatory authorities in the EU Member States of EU rules applying to the redistribution of surplus food.

The impact of the Circular Economy on the Fast-Moving Consumer Goods industry: a study

Start/End date: 
26/09/2018
Country: 
Other (EU)
City: 
Brussels

Coordination Group activity type:

Abstract: 

Study on Identifying the Impact of the Circular Economy on the FMCG industry: Opportunities and Challenges for Labour Market, Supply Chains and Consumer Behaviour

2nd meeting of the Coordination Group of the European Circular Economy Stakeholder Platform

Start/End date: 
18/10/2018 to 19/10/2018
Country: 
Belgium
City: 
Brussels

Sectors in focus:

Scope:

Coordination Group activity type:

Abstract: 

The second meeting of the ECESP Coordination Group was held on 18 and 19 October 2018 in Brussels to discuss the platform's activities, define objectives for the coming year and reflect on its overall implementation.

1st Meeting of the Coordination Group of the European Circular Economy Stakeholder Platform

Start/End date: 
23/11/2017
Country: 
Belgium
City: 
Brussels

Sectors in focus:

Coordination Group activity type:

Abstract: 

The first meeting of the ECESP Coordination Group provided a fertile ground for discussion on how the platform will reach its objectives.

EU Platform on Food Losses and Food Waste

Country: 
EU

Language for original content:

Contact: 
Sante Food Waste

The Communication on Circular Economy, adopted in 2015, calls on the Commission to establish a Platform dedicated to food waste prevention. Thus the EU Platform on Food Losses and Food Waste (FLW) was established in 2016, as an informal European Commission expert group bringing together EU institutions, international organisations, experts from Member States and actors in the food value chain including consumer and other non-governmental organisations.

The Platform aids the Commission in identifying and prioritising actions to be taken at EU level in order to prevent food losses and food waste and supports all actors in identifying and implementing appropriate actions to take at national, regional and local levels. Its work is of a horizontal nature, aiming to identify opportunities for food waste prevention across the food production and consumption chain and facilitate inter-sector cooperation.

The most recent estimates of European food waste levels (FUSIONS, 2016) reveal that 70% of EU food waste arises in the household, food service and retail sectors, with production and processing sectors contributing the remaining 30%. The EU and Member States are committed to meeting Sustainable Development Goal 12.3, adopted in September 2015, which targets to halve per capita food waste at the retail and consumer level by 2030 and reduce food losses along the food production and supply chains.

 

All relevant documents related to the work of the Platform (such as agendas, minutes and participants' submissions) can be found on the Commission's dedicated food waste website

11 Oct 2018
ACR+ - one-stop shop for cities in transit to CE

ACR+ is co-organising a workshop to inform cities and network organisations of the opportunities of the European Circular Economy Stakeholder Platform as a portal to strategies and case studies in CE.

Luxembourg's Climate Pact now also mainstreams circular economy in local policy

The Climate Pact, which was set up by Luxembourg's Ministry of Sustainable Development and Infrastructure in order to enable municipalities wishing to actively tackle climate change to request State support by signing an engagement charter, now includes measures on circular economy.

28 Nov 2018 to 30 Nov 2018

G-STIC 2018 builds onto the key findings of G-STIC 2017, which demonstrate that a transition to a new industry framework requires a circular economy approach that is enabled by smart technologies.

Circular Futures - Austria's Circular Economy Platform

Start/End date: 
01/03/2018 to 31/12/2020
Country: 
Austria
City: 
Vienna

Sectors in focus:

Coordination Group activity type:

Abstract: 

The Austrian Circular Economy Platform Circular Futures was launched in March 2018 at the House of the European Union in Vienna.

Circular Futures-Plattform Kreislaufwirtschaft Österreich

Plattform Kreislaufwirtschaft Austria

Platform Type:

Country: 
Austria

Language for original content:

Sector:

Contact: 
Julika Dittrich

"Circular Futures - Plattform Kreislaufwirtschaft Österreich" is a solution-oriented multistakeholder platform that brings together professionals across relevant industries, the administration, politics, science and civil society in Austria. Circular Futures acts as a think-tank, incubator, and catalyst for projects and initiatives necessary for a successful transition to a circular economy in Austria.

Circular Futures offers:

  • A website that serves as a central information and communication platform;
  • Knowledge events on the circular economy to inform and mobilise stakeholders;
  • Targeted capacity-building for relevant stakeholders through workshops, trainings, and the publication of project information;
  • The coordination of local activities and strengthening of regional networks; and
  • The involvement of relevant stakeholders in political processes (consultations, strategy/guideline developments, etc.) through information-sharing and mobilization.

Circular Futures AT is a collaboration between the Umweltdachverband and the European Environmental Bureau (EEB), the Reuse and Repair Network Austria (RepaNet), and the Verband Abfallberatung Österreich (VABÖ).

Circular Economy opportunities in the furniture sector

Type:

Author: 
EEB, Eunomia
Publication Date: 
09/2017
Country: 
Belgium

Language for original content:

Sector:

Scope:

Contact: 
Stephane Arditi

This EEB and Eunomia report estimates the material consumption and CO2 emissions of the furniture sector at EU level and suggests some circular scenarios and policy options to grasp improvement opportunities.

Around a quarter of the world’s furniture is manufactured within the European Union – representing a €84 billion market that equates to an EU28 consumption of ~10.5 million tonnes of furniture per annum while employing approximately 1 million European workers and consisting of, predominantly, SMEs.

Businesses and consumers discard 10 million tonnes of furniture in EU Member States each year, the majority of which is destined for either landfill or incineration. There is minimal activity in higher-value circular resource flows, with remanufacturing accounting for less than 2% of the EU manufacturing turnover. In terms of furniture in particular, whilst reuse is common this tends to be on a small scale and with local social goals in mind.

Barriers to a circular furniture sector range from low quality materials, limited logistical infrastructure, poor demand for recycled materials to a wider range identified through the course of this research, informed through stakeholder consultation and literature review.

A move towards circular economy models within the European furniture sector would benefit from a variety of complimentary policy instruments to deal with market failures on the supply side (i.e. ensuring return of items and creating durable, refurbished and remanufactured items) and the demand side (creating demand for these products). The report concludes by estimating the impacts on additional tonnes reused & recycled, net carbon reduction and job creation these policy options might have separately. 

Various policy instruments thus have the potential to help overcoming the main barriers, with a need to address both supply side and demand side issues to provide both the market push and pull required. The logic suggests that a mandatory but simple Extended Producer Responsibility system, with gradually increasing targets for ‘preparing for reuse’ and separate recycling targets, would provide the most certainty in terms of positive outcomes.

 

 

26 Nov 2018 to 27 Nov 2018
ecovation 2018 logo

ECOVATION 2018 is a two-day conference on innovation and Sustainability in Public Procurement organised by the Austrian Service Center for Public Procurement Promoting Innovation on behalf of the Federal Ministries for Digital and Economic Affairs; Transport, Innovation and Technology.

24 Sep 2018
Lodz bioeconomy congress logo

The European Bioeconomy Congress Lodz 2018 will be held on September 24th, 2018, in Lodz, Poland to support the development of a bioeconomy in the Central and Eastern European Bioregions.

17 Sep 2018 to 18 Sep 2018
Ringmajanduse konverents logo

Event type:

City: 
Tallinn
Country: 
Estonia

Sector:

The Estonian Ministry of Environment is organising its first conference on the circular economy for entrepreneurs in retail, mining and manufacturing 17-18 September in Tallinn. This conference will showcase innovative activities and circular business models to entrepreneurs, who can also benefit from one-on-one counselling and specialised workshops for free. 

LIPOR is committed to transition from waste to resource management

Commitment Targets
Start Date: 
December 2018

LIPOR's Environmental Education and Intervention Program aims to create an educational offer that encourages citizens to implement good environmental practices and facilitates the acquisition of skills that support civic intervention and a sustainable development.

LIPOR intends to reach 90 000 people with its awareness campaign within its catchment area. This involves delivering about 10 direct environmental awareness actions to the community its environmental education technicians daily.

Start Date: 
December 2018

LIPOR’s annual prevention programme includes several projects and initiatives implemented across all  eight municipalities aiming to prevent and reduce food waste.

With the “Embrulha" (Pack It) project LIPOR wants to engage 50 restaurants in Porto Municipality and 10 restaurants in other LIPOR municipalities to recover 6 tonnes of food waste.

The "Dose Certa" (Right Portion) project aims to certify 46 food establishments in total.

Start Date: 
December 2020

The Strategic Plan for Urban Waste 2020 (PERSU 2020) is the reference instrument of the urban waste policy in Portugal.

LIPOR has defined a target of 50 kg per inhabitant a year in 2020 for selective collection as a goal. Several projects that aim to increase multi-material and organic recovery figures are defined in LIPOR's strategic plan.

For landfills, the target is a maximum value of landfill of biodegradable waste deposition of 10%. 

Start Date: 
December 2018

One public tender for catering services with fully sustainable and circular criteria.

Cleanteach-Cluster Upper Austria

Logo Cleantech-Cluster

The Upper Autrian Cleantech-Cluster networks all actors from the resource supplier, to the manufacturer, industrial researcher, to mechanical engineers, recyclers, and disposers in order to find joint solutions and develop new technologies. We cooperate with our 10 cluster initiatives in the Upper Austrian business support agency and 2000 partner companies, whose activities range from plastics, to automotive, furniture and wood construction, food, medical technology, mechatronics, IT, logistics, and HR, In order to support projects for SMEs in particular, the cluster also supports EU funding applications, thus offering its partners an internationally mature circular economy toolbox.

THEMES and EXPERTISE in the network:

  • Material efficiency in production
  • Recycling
  • Recovery
  • Disposal
  • Circular design
  • Business Models
  • Initial and continuing education
  • Research

SERVICES:

  • Cross-sector networking with researchers, companies, associations (regional, national, international)
  • Project development
  • Project Management
  • Process support through conception, moderation of workshops, work meetings, events
  • Funding advice

Developing a national programme for textiles and clothing recovery

Developing a national programme for textiles and clothing recovery

Author: 
Mohammad Bukharu, Ruth Carrasco-Gallego, Eva Ponce-Cueto
Publication Date: 
03/2018
Country: 
France

Language for original content:

Textiles waste is relatively small in terms of weight as compared to other waste streams, but it has a large impact on human health and environment, and its rate is increasing due to the ‘fast fashion’ model. In this paper, the authors examine the French national programme for managing post-consumer textiles and clothing through a case study research.

France is the only country in the world implementing an extended producer responsibility (EPR) policy for end-of-use clothing, linen and shoes. The case highlights the benefits of using an EPR policy and provides interesting insights about the challenges faced by the textiles waste sector. For instance, the EPR policy has contributed to a threefold increase in the collection and recycling rates of post-consumer textiles since 2006. In addition, the material recovery rate of the post-consumer textiles can reach 90%, 50% of which can be directly reused. However, the ‘reuse’ stream is facing some challenges because its main market is in Africa and many African countries are considering banning the import of used textiles to encourage a competitive textiles industry locally and internationally.

The EPR policy shows a great potential to identify new markets for ‘reuse’ and to improve the textiles waste sector. Such an EPR policy also could drive societies to financially support innovation and research to provide feasible solutions for fashion producers to adopt eco-design and design for recycling practices. This paper provides guidance for policy makers, shareholders, researchers and practitioners interested in diverting post-consumer textiles and clothing waste from landfills and promoting circular textiles transition.

Starbucks to phase out plastic straws from all its stores worldwide by 2020

Starbucks to phase out plastic straws worldwide by 2020
Country: 
EU, Other (Worldwide)
Commitment Targets
To be achieved by: 
December 2020

Starbucks target is to phase out plastic straws from its more than 28,000 stores worldwide by 2020, a decision that will eliminate more than 1 billion straws a year.

Die Oekonomischen auswirkungen einer Verbesserung des Deutschen Gewaehrleistungsrechts

Study on the economic impact of extending warranty rights in Europe

Type:

Author: 
Kilian Bizer, Martin Fuehr, Till Proeger
Publication Date: 
09/2016
Country: 
Germany

Language for original content:

Scope:

Contact: 
Otmar Lell

The study analysed the economic effects of the transposition of Directive 1999/44/EC concerning warranty rights, which had to be transposed into national law by January 2002. A number of publications had suggested that strengthening warranty rights for consumer goods as foreseen in the directive could increase the price level of these goods, possibly resulting in a reduced purchases. The study addressed both questions by analysing data from several EU countries. The first question was addressed by analysing inflation rates of general prices and of prices for the consumer goods affected by the directive in the time period 1998 until 2002. The second question was analysed by looking at the share of consumers who used online consumer-to-consumer markets, which were not covered by the warranty rights foreseen in the directive.

The comparison of inflation rates for consumer goods showed that inflation rates for consumer goods were below the general inflation rate between 1998 and 2004. Therefore, between 1998 and 2004 prices for the different groups of consumer goods covered by the directive did not increase but actually appear to have decreased slightly. This effect has been found for all countries analysed with no significant differences between countries transposing the minimum standards and those that went beyond. The second part of the analysis addressed the question if a developed market for online consumer-to-consumer selling of goods exists, for which the new seller's warranties weren't valid. In case of price increases for business-to-consumer markets – which have not been found in the first part of the analysis – part of the transactions could be transferred to these markets. The analysis showed that the vast majority of consumers in Western European countries used the internet regularly to purchase goods, including the online-platform Ebay. In case of increasing prices for consumer goods because of strengthened warranty rights, part of the transactions would move to online consumer-to-consumer markets rather than resulting in an overall decline of consumer goods purchases. The general conclusion was that over the analysed time period no negative impact of strengthened warranty rights on the price level of consumer goods could be found.

18 Jul 2018 to 19 Jul 2018
Bologna conference logo

The European Movement Italy will host a two-day international workshop on "A New Successful Economic, Industrial, Financial, Territorial Management Model – SDGs & Circular Economy" in Bologna . This workshop, organised in collaboration with civil society partners and local authorities, aims to link the circular economy to the Sustainable Development Goals as a useful method to achieve these and adopt a new developmental paradigm.

The SDGs & Circular Economy workshop will provide an overview of initiatives at the European and Italian level, discuss existing projects, initiatives and policies, and formulate recommendations.

Cerrar el círculo: el business case de la economía circular

Type:

Author: 
Elena Ruiz , Paula Ruiz
Publication Date: 
07/2018
Country: 
Spain

Language for original content:

Scope:

Contact: 
Elena Ruiz
Paula Ruiz

"Cerrar el círculo: el business case de la economía circular" (Closing the loop: the business case for a circular economy) is a report authored in 2018 by Foretica, which shows the latest trends in circular economy, a practical roadmap to guide companies towards a circular mindset as well as best practices from 9 companies that are leading the transition towards a circular economy in Spain.

Forética is a multi-stakeholder non-profit organisation working to promoting ethical and socially responsible policies at the core of institutional and corporate values. In 2017, Foretica launched the Circular Economy Action Group with 9 leading companies: Ecoembes, Endesa, Naturgy, IKEA Ibérica, ING, LafargeHolcim, Nestlé, OHL and Unilever.

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