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Circular design

Michael Laermann

REFUCOAT: recycling food packaging and preventing salmonella

Refucoat project

The European REFUCOAT project developed innovative, efficient, bioplastic food packaging production processes using renewable, recyclable materials which could replace conventional fossil fuel-based raw materials. Three different bio-based active packaging systems were developed.

Titan Greece: making circular cement a reality

Concrete

Titan Greece - a cement and building material producer - plays an active role in the implementation of a circular economy model at various stages of the production process.

Ostraco: from discarded oyster shells to beautiful glass

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Country: 
France

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In France, the designer Lucile Viaud found her way to contribute to organic recycling. More precisely, to recycling of seafood waste. Her work is focused on transforming oyster shells into glass.

An unexpected ally in promoting sustainability: flies!

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Country: 
Bulgaria

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Nasekomo is a company based in Bulgaria that uses insects (specifically Black Soldier Flies) to produce sustainable insect protein, oils and fertilisers that can be used for feed and in agricultural industries. Nasekomo’s goal is to use – and increase the usage of – these insects as part of a global solution to the issues caused by the exponential consumption of meat.

ReSociety

ReSociety is a global collective initiative which aims to promote and accelerate the transformation to the circular economy. It is a gathering point for circular mindsets to align, share lessons, co-create solutions and spark new innovations. ReSociety is open to consumers, educators, NGOs, journalists, enterprises, policymakers and industries from all over the world. It is founded on the belief that by working together, it is possible to scale solutions for a more sustainable future.

ReSociety was initiated by TOMRA's Circular Economy Division in early 2020 to exchange research and knowledge, establish new partnerships and share ideas on holistic waste and resource systems, which are essential for developing circular value chains.

22 Jan 2021
Eurocommerce

EuroCommerce invites you to a webinar with Virginijus Sinkevičius on 22 January 2021 from 14.00 to 15.00 (CET).

Remix El Barrio - Co-designing with Biomaterials from food leftovers

Remix El Barrio

Remix El Barrio engages with stakeholders and innovative designers to support a circular transition which revalues surplus food and biowaste.

Upcycling and creative recovery by a sustainable enterprise of handicraftswomen

ISA

ISA - a sustainable enterprise of handicraftswomen - gives special attention to sustainability in its production chain, by employing production scraps and waste from diverse local companies, preferably choosing natural and ecofriendly products.

White paper - Durable and repairable products: 20 steps to a sustainable Europe

Durable and repairable products
Author: 
Adèle Chasson, Public Affairs Manager of HOP , Laetitia Vasseur, Co-Founder and Director of HOP , Alice Papillon, HOP, Ariane Jamin, HOP
Publication Date: 
11/2020
Country: 
EU

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European consumers lack the means to improve the durability of their products. In addition to harming the environment by emitting CO2, extracting non-renewable resources unnecessarily and creating waste, premature obsolescence in all its forms affects citizens’ purchasing power, their right to repair and their freedom to make their products last longer.

This white paper aims to give all stakeholders suggestions and ideas to move towards a world in which repair and responsible consumption are the norm. This will necessarily imply new constraints on manufacturers, that can no longer make products without taking durability and repair into account. It will also require new tools to inform citizens so that they are empowered in their consumption choices.

16 Feb 2021
Rethinking Plastics logo

How to stop plastics ending up in the ocean? The Rethinking Plastics – Circular Economy Solutions to Marine Litter project is working on solutions together with seven countries in East and South East Asia.

EPR Toolbox | Know-how to enable Extended Producer Responsibility for packaging

EPR Toolbox - Know-how to enable Extended Producer Responsibility for packaging

PREVENT Waste Alliance
Author: 
Agnes Bünemann, Jana Brinkmann, Dr. Stephan Löhle, Sabine Bartnik
Publication Date: 
10/2020
Country: 
Germany

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Pollution caused by incorrect packaging of waste is a serious problem. It can be addressed by designing products that are easier to recycle and by investing in collection and recycling systems. Establishing these kinds of systems requires a strong coordination body, backed up by transparent and stable sources of funding.

Experience suggests that the principle of Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) can have significant potential to achieve a range of policy objectives. The EPR Toolbox contains detailed information about EPR and provides an introduction to a number of distinct issues.

PREVENT Waste Alliance

PREVENT logo

Initiated under the patronage of the German Development Minister Gerd Müller, the PREVENT Waste Alliance was launched in May 2019. It serves as a platform for exchange and international cooperation. Organisations from the private sector, academia, civil society and public institutions jointly engage for a circular economy.

The PREVENT Waste Alliance wants to contribute to minimising waste, eliminating pollutants and maximising the reuse of resources in the economy worldwide. Members of the platform work together for waste prevention, collection, and recycling as well as the increased uptake of secondary resources in low- and middle-income countries.

The platform focuses on waste from plastic packaging and single use products as well as waste electrical and electronic equipment.

Analysing European Union circular economy policies: words versus actions

Analysing European Union circular economy policies: words versus actions

ScienceDirect

The academic paper "Analysing European Union circular economy policies: words versus actions" comprehensively reviews and analyses the EU’s circular economy (CE) policies. Results show a dichotomy between words and actions, with a discourse that is rather holistic, while policies focus on “end of pipe solutions”.

To address these limitations, the paper proposes a set of 32 science-based policy recommendations which can help strengthen circular economy policies both within and outside the EU. This research thus brings key insights for practitioners and academics seeking to better understand the EU’s CE policies and how to improve circular economy implementation at both national and international level.

See here for more results, insights and recommendations.

Recycling of obsolete furniture and furnishings by Revì

Revì

Revì aims to have a social impact by raising awareness about recycling furniture and encouraging local crafts. It also has an environmental impact by recovering material which would otherwise be classed as rubbish.

07 Jun 2021 to 09 Jun 2021
Smart Circular Economy

Smart Circular Economy is an international workshop focusing on the role of ICT as an enabler for the circular economy. Accepted and presented papers will appear in the IEEE Xplore library and all major publication indexes (DBLP, Scopus, etc.).

Resilience and the Circular Economy - Opportunities and Risks

Resilience and the circular economy: Opportunities and risks

Resilience and the circular economy

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Author: 
Joke Dufourmont (Circle Economy), Natalia Papú Carrone (Circle Economy), Laxmi Haigh (Circle Economy)
Publication Date: 
09/2020
Country: 
EU, Other (Ecuador, India)

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The report analyses the relationship between resilience and the circular economy.

It presents socio-ecological resilience mechanisms, with particular reference to the impacts of COVID-19.

It explores various relevant topics such as resource efficiency, shared resources, regenerative resources, decentralisation, skills transferability, lifelong learning, flexible labour contracts and the strengthening of the sociological foundation.

It also presents three case studies from the Netherlands, Ecuador and India, showing how local companies enhance resilience and reduce vulnerability in various sectors.

Lastly, it gives recommendations for educating stakeholders in how to improve and implement stronger circular economy strategies. 

Innovation competition for sustainable plastic use: How do we shape a sustainable food system?

Innovation competition for sustainable plastic use: How do we shape a sustainable food system?

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Author: 
Swedish Environmental Protection Agency
Publication Date: 
10/2020
Country: 
Sweden

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This report describes innovation competition as a method of tackling major environmental challenges, specifically how to provide food sustainably and resource-efficiently in the future.

Two teams with expertise in plastics, logistics and sustainability developed solutions focused on a more regional food supply enabling us to reduce the amount of plastic, packaging and transport used. The winning submission is a conversion tool describing the principles of sustainable production and consumption of food.

Recycling polyurethane foam in pressurised containers

PU foam pressurised containers are used to fill gaps and to insulate and install window and door frames so as to make buildings airtight. OCF (one-component foam) producers have invested in a recycling company which recycles the metals in the packaging material, the reactive residual polyurethane prepolymer and the propellant.

Contributions to evaluate design investment in Portuguese agro-food industry

Circular design for circular economy

Composto organico

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Author: 
Filipa Pias
Publication Date: 
05/2017
Country: 
Portugal

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How can design help the circular economy? Design is born from the need to find or adapt solutions to everyday problems.

Design is present throughout the value chain: production, location, distribution, transformation, transport, sales and user experience. Design can minimise the impact on the environment and simultaneously empower people in their habits and environmental preservation. This is done through shapes, materials, production processes, colours, legibility, concept and narratives that value what is systemic.

A design project starts by thinking about what you intend to achieve. A design collaboration (a dynamic of cause and effect) helps identify weaknesses and opportunities when it comes to adopting a circular design to each stage of the process.

Packaging & packaging waste - Making waste a resource

Eurocities

In its position paper, Eurocities aims at contributing to the revision of the EU legislation on packaging and packaging waste by making proposals on:

  • packaging design (to facilitate separate sorting by citizens, and further dismantling for reuse or recycling, i.e. less complexity in packaging materials)
  • compostable/biodegradable plastic packaging (citizens cannot distinguish between biodegradable/compostable and more ‘conventional’ ones; the Commission should assess if this packaging can benefit the environment or create more littering and hamper waste collection, reuse and recycling)
  • reuse and recycling (new legislation should consider EU-wide mandatory labelling to identify packaging as reusable, recyclable or compostable) and
  • extending the EPR schemes.

 

IALD Position Paper on Circular Economy: good lighting doesn't just happen... it's designed

IALD
Author: 
The International Association of Lighting Designers
Publication Date: 
09/2020
Country: 
Belgium

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Following the publication of the Circular Economy Action Plan in March 2020, the International Association of Lighting Designers (IALD) recently released a position paper to help ensure that any future regulations reflect the needs and aspirations of the lighting design profession.

The paper also addresses the impact of changes in the value chains of the lighting sector as a result of embracing circular economy - be it by creating second-hand markets or by adopting lighting as a service business model.

In its conclusion, the paper describes how lighting manufacturers, designers, contractors and clients could work together to ensure that the benefits of the circular economy can be achieved.

Circular Navarre Catalogue

Circular Navarre Catalogue

The Circular Navarre Catalogue is a booklet showcasing 20 organisations - based on circular business models - in the Navarre region, who are looking for international cooperation. 

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