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Knowledge

In this section you will find knowledge such as studies, reports, presentations and position papers….. all submitted by stakeholders.

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A two-year stakeholders’ consultation on the construction and infrastructure value chains

A two-year stakeholders’ consultation on the construction and infrastructure value chains

ENEA

Type:

Author: 
ENEA
Publication Date: 
02/2022
Country: 
Italy

Language for original content:

This paper by ENEA focuses on circular economy in the construction sector, by illustrating the main market dynamics related to materials for buildings and infrastructures, and active and/or potential value chain collaborations in a circular and industrial symbiosis perspective.

    The paper offers an overview of:

    1. the relevance of construction and infrastructure value chains within the EU economy,
    2. their potential for circularity, resource efficiency and decarbonisation and
    3. the main barriers and levers.

    Contributors:

    Why steel recycles forever: How to collect, sort and recycle steel for packaging

    Steel Packaging

    Type:

    Author: 
    Association of European Producers of Steel for Packaging. (APEAL) Steel for Packaging
    Publication Date: 
    02/2022
    Country: 
    Belgium

    Language for original content:

    Sector:

    Contact: 
    Steve Claus Contact details

    This report, which contains best practices and policy recommendations, provides updated information relevant to all organisations and stakeholders, both in the public and private sector, who wish to learn more about material recycling.

    The objective is to help stakeholders - throughout the whole value chain - work collaboratively to achieve APEAL’s vision of zero steel packaging to landfill by 2025.

    Steel for packaging is already the most recycled primary packaging material in Europe (2019 recycling rate: 84%), bringing great savings in emissions, resource and energy use.

    Steel’s unique inherent qualities give it a natural advantage. Its magnetic properties make it easy and economical to recycle. As a permanent material, it can also be recycled forever.

    Industrial Transformation 2050 - - Pathways to Net-Zero Emissions from EU Heavy Industry

    Industrial transformation 2050

    Type:

    Author: 
    Material Economics
    Publication Date: 
    10/2019
    Country: 
    Sweden

    Language for original content:

    Scope:

    Karolina Vikingsson Contact details

    There is an intense debate about how to close the gap between the current climate policy and the aim of the Paris Agreement to achieve close to net-zero emissions by mid-century. The materials and chemicals that heavy industry produces are essential inputs to major value chains: transportation, infrastructure, construction, consumer goods, agriculture.

    Material Economics' study Industrial Transformation 2050 - Pathways to Net-Zero Emissions from EU Heavy Industry starts with a broad mapping of options to eliminate fossil CO2-emissions from production, including many emerging innovations in production processes. It also integrates them with the potential for a more circular economy: making a better use of the materials already produced and so reducing the need for new production.

    Circularity Gap Report 2022: five years of analysis by Circle Economy

    Circularity Gap Report 2022

    Type:

    Author: 
    Marc de Wit
    Publication Date: 
    01/2022
    Country: 
    Netherlands

    Language for original content:

    Scope:

    Lenka Homolka Contact details

    The Circularity Gap Report 2022 draws on five years of analysis to show the power of the circular economy to equitably fulfil our global needs and wants, with radically fewer materials and emissions.

    The 2022 report by impact organisation Circle Economy reveals that the throwaway global economy is fuelling the climate crisis, with more than half a trillion tonnes of virgin materials consumed since the 2015 Paris Agreement was signed.

    Circular economy solutions can have a huge impact on climate change. This is because 70% of greenhouse gas emissions are related to the production and use of products – from the buildings we live in and the transport we use to the food we eat and the clothes we wear.

    Circular Economy: Leveraging a Sustainable Transformation

    Circular Economy: Leveraging a Sustainable Transformation

    Nachhaltigkeitsrat

    Type:

    Author: 
    German Council for Sustainable Development
    Publication Date: 
    02/2022
    Country: 
    Germany

    Language for original content:

    Scope:

    It has been established that the circular economy has a high leverage effect and some progress in this field has been made, but the circular economy has yet to top the political agenda. A strategic approach to circularity is urgently needed and should be developed, managed and implemented in a cross-ministerial capacity in line with efforts at EU level and together with partner nations.

    Against this backdrop, the German Council for Sustainable Development (RNE) recommends organising the transition to circularity via a new, cross-ministerial governance mechanism coordinated by the German Federal Chancellery. RNE’s statement covers a further 13 recommendations, ranging from the need for social safeguarding instruments to expanding education and research.

    Microplastics from textiles: towards a circular economy for textiles in Europe

    Microplastics from textiles: towards a circular economy for textiles in Europe

    EEA

    Type:

    Author: 
    European Topic Centre on Circular Economy and Resource Use (ETC/CE) for the EEA (2021
    Publication Date: 
    02/2022
    Country: 
    EU

    Language for original content:

    Awareness is increasing about the presence of microplastics in our environment and their negative impact on ecosystems, animals and people. The wearing/washing of textiles made from synthetic fibers is one recognised source of microplastics in the environment. Textiles and plastics are among the key value chains in the EU circular economy action plan.

    It is possible to reduce or prevent the release of microplastics from textiles by implementing sustainable design and production processes and caretaking measures that control microplastic emissions during use, and by improving disposal and end-of-life processing.

    This briefing aims to improve our understanding of microplastics released from textiles from a European perspective and identify pathways to reduce or prevent this release.

    Textiles and the Environment The role of design in Europe's circular economy

    Textiles and the environment: The role of design in Europe’s circular economy

    EEA

    Type:

    Author: 
    European Topic Centre on Circular Economy and Resource Use (ETC/CE) for the EEA (2021)
    Publication Date: 
    02/2022
    Country: 
    EU

    Language for original content:

    Key Area:

    Circular design is an important enabler of the transition towards sustainable production and consumption of textiles through circular business models. The design phase plays a critical role in each of the four pathways to achieving a circular textile sector:

    1. longevity and durability
    2. optimised resource use
    3. collection and reuse
    4. recycling and material use.

    This briefing aims to improve our understanding of the environmental and climate impacts of textiles from a European perspective and to identify design principles and measures to increase circularity in textiles. It is underpinned by a report from the EEA's European Topic Centre on Circular Economy and Resource Use available here.

     

    Towards A Circular Energy Transition

    Metabolic

    Type:

    Author: 
    Pieter van Exter
    Publication Date: 
    06/2021
    Country: 
    Netherlands

    Language for original content:

    Scope:

    Beth Njeri Contact details

    Concern continues to grow regarding the availability of critical metals. Such rare or scarce metals, like lithium or cobalt, are not only vital to the world’s major economies. They are also crucial for a transition to a renewable energy system in the Netherlands. At current levels, the global supply of these metals is insufficient, and the Dutch demand for them is no exception.

    This study Towards A Circular Energy Transition serves to provide insight into the demand for critical metals domestically over the next few decades, to offer perspectives on how to reduce this demand, and to demonstrate the opportunities these new measures present to industry in the Netherlands.

    What can we learn from the Nordics about Circular Economy?

    What can we learn from the Nordic countries about the circular economy?

    The goal of the circular economy is to take full advantage of all available resources through reducing, reusing, repairing and recycling. The recent Nordic Circular Summit in Copenhagen covered topics from public administration programmes to innovative techniques and renewable practices in the marine and food industries.

    What can we learn about the circular economy from the Nordic perspective? Find some answers in this position paper.

    Quick Scan Circular Business Models - a white paper

    Circulaire Maakindustrie
    Author: 
    Jan Jonker, Niels Faber, Timber Haaker
    Publication Date: 
    02/2022
    Country: 
    Netherlands

    Language for original content:

    Key Area:

    This white paper on Quick Scan Circular Business Models - Inspiration for organising value retention in loops from the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs and Climate Policy offers an approach for developing a circular business model. It is based on a classification for existing and future circular business models developed in 2021. It consists of seven basic models geared primarily to the manufacturing industry, although it can also be used in other sectors.

    The paper is divided into three parts:

    1. an introduction explaining the background and central concepts
    2. an overview of the seven circular business models comprising the classification, and
    3. the actual Quick Scan.

    The interactive Quick Scan version can be found here.

    Pages